East African Breweries Limited (EABL.tz) 2004 Annual Report

first_imgEast African Breweries Limited (EABL.tz) listed on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange under the Beverages sector has released it’s 2004 annual report.For more information about East African Breweries Limited (EABL.tz) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the East African Breweries Limited (EABL.tz) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: East African Breweries Limited (EABL.tz)  2004 annual report.Company ProfileEast African Breweries Limited produces and distributes a range of beer and spirit brands and non-alcoholic beverages. Popular brands include Tusker Malt Lager, Tusker Lite, Guinness, Pilsner, White Cap Lager, Allsopps Lager, Balozi Lager, Senator Lager, Bell Lager, Serengeti Premium Lager, Johnnie Walker, Smirnoff, Kenya Cane, Chrome Vodka and Ciroc. East African Breweries has operations in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania and South Sudan; and exports alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages to Rwanda, Burundi and the Great Lakes region. Subsidiary companies include Kenya Breweries Limited, Uganda Breweries Limited, East African Breweries (Mauritius) Limited, International Distillers Uganda Limited and East African Maltings (Kenya) Limited. Established in 1922, the group has its headquarters in Ruaraka, near the capital of Nairobi. East African Breweries Limited is listed on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Centum Investment Limited (CTUM.ke) 2018 Presentation

first_imgCentum Investment Limited (CTUM.ke) listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange under the Investment sector has released it’s 2018 presentation For more information about Centum Investment Limited (CTUM.ke) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Centum Investment Limited (CTUM.ke) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Centum Investment Limited (CTUM.ke)  2018 presentation Company ProfileCentum Investment Limited is an equity firm specialising in investing in areas of growth, developmental capital and buyouts and seek to make equity investments between US$2 and US$20 million. The company invests in enterprises in the agricultural, education, healthcare, energy, financial services, insurance, information and communication technology, food and beverages, catering, automotive, publishing, real estate, power and FMCG sectors. In the beverage sector, it invests in businesses manufacturing alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages and carbonated soft drinks. These companies operate in and serve the needs of domestic markets in Africa sub-regions. In most private equity investments, it prefers to acquire a controlling and significant minor stake in the company. The head office of Centum Investment Company is in Nairobi, Kenya. Centum Investment Limited is listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchangelast_img read more

Make sure Gift Aid forms are correct

AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 8 November 2000 | News ThirdSector magazine this week reports that the Inland Revenue is sending back Gift Aid declaration forms because the wording is imprecise. In particular, the forms should not refer just to ‘tax’ but to ‘income tax’ or ‘capital gains tax’. The magazine prints the text of a correctly worded Gift Aid form on p.3.  14 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Advertisement Make sure Gift Aid forms are correct read more

CCR Data adds mobile telephone number append to its services

first_img UK data cleansing and data enrichment specialist CCR Data is now offering ‘mobile append’ to its range of data enrichment services via its partner Direct Data Services Ltd. It can now match supporter records with mobile phone numbers.Edward Spicer, Managing Director at CCR Data said: “Mobile append is a fantastic opportunity for customers to reach a target audience in a new way strengthening relationships and deriving a greater return on investment from data.”Direct Data Services are specialists in appending contact data to customer databases, and have created large pooled databases of emails, landline and mobile numbers. On average they can append mobile telephone numbers to 15% of a client’s records. Advertisement Howard Lake | 29 January 2013 | News  38 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Sarah Colin, Strategic Partnership Manager at Direct Data Services commented: “Our partnership with CCR goes from strength to strength as they help their clients find new ways to maintain contact with their customer base.”www.ccr.co.ukcenter_img CCR Data adds mobile telephone number append to its services Tagged with: Consulting & Agencies data Individual giving AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

Wine tasting fundraising challenge introduced by Royal Society for Blind Children

first_img Tagged with: fundraising events Howard Lake | 14 July 2017 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis13  155 total views,  1 views today Advertisement  156 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis13 The Winefold Challenge involves blindfolded participants tasting a selection of wines throughout the challenge, guessing their colour and grape variety. The winner is the taster who can name the most varieties, from Pinot and Sauvignon to Shiraz and Grenache.The challenge has been designed to be enjoyed by wine lovers across the country, from novice tasters to the wine connoisseur.Using taste not sight in the Winefold ChallengeWinefold Challenge packRSBC has developed a guide for anyone who wants to take up the challenge. The Winefold Challenge pack includes information on how RSBC supports blind children, young people and their families and why they need support from donors.It also includes tips on how to plan the event and gives some hints on how to tell a Merlot from a Malbec. The charity has also developed some fun online resources and free downloads for hosts to set the scene for their event, with bottle covers and a Spotify playlist among them.Liz Ives, Events Fundraising Manager, said: “We are very excited to introduce our first wine tasting challenge event to new and existing supporters of RSBC. The charity has held a number of blindfolded wine tasting events over the years, with great success, so we’re confident that it will be a hit with our supporters. Unlike many charity led challenge events, we’re not putting a fundraising target on this one.  We will welcome any proceeds from the event, which will all be used to improve the lives of our beneficiaries.” The Winefold Challenge is a new wine tasting challenge event from the Royal Society for Blind Children (RSBC).Groups of friends or families are encouraged to come together and raise a glass together with funds for blind children living in England and Wales. The event can be held at home or after hours with work colleagues.The event is particularly appropriate for the charity. It requires participants to experience being sightless temporarily by wearing a blindfold, and to focus on another sense, in this case smell.A Winefold Challenge party Wine tasting fundraising challenge introduced by Royal Society for Blind Children About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Donegal County Council launches ‘Here Comes the Summer’

first_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Donegal County Council have launched their ‘Here Comes the Summer’ campaign, which aims to keep the county clean and tidy.Thousands more visitors are expected in Donegal this year as the Wild Atlantic Way becomes more and more popular.The initiative is backing locals and visitors to team up over the holiday season and ensure they protect the countryside, mountains and beaches.Dearn McClintock, the councils Waste Regulations Officer says ‘Here Comes the Summer’ has a few simple messages:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/dearn1pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Facebook Pinterest By admin – July 1, 2015 WhatsApp Google+ WhatsApp Previous articleMotor cyclist banned for speeding at 215 kilometres per hourNext articleUS philanthropist named the recipient of the annual Tip O’Neill Irish Diaspora Award admin center_img Homepage BannerNews Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Pinterest Google+ Facebook Donegal County Council launches ‘Here Comes the Summer’ Twitter Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

Mom, 5 kids hunker down in North Carolina as ‘crazy and frightening’ Hurricane Florence hits home

first_imgChip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WILMINGTON, N.C.) — A mother has hunkered down with her five children and dog in their Wilmington, North Carolina, home as Hurricane Florence bears down.Melissa Cellucci, who lives 20 minutes from Wrightsville Beach where the hurricane made landfall, told ABC News she is riding out the storm at home while her husband Joe, an EMT, is on lockdown working at Hanover County Regional Medical Center.Since the Category 1 storm with tropical force-winds made landfall around 7 a.m. Friday morning, Cellucci said she has seen evidence of the hurricane’s force in her own backyard.“It’s crazy and frightening,” she said. “We’ve been watching trees being torn down and our backyard fence get ripped apart all morning from the winds.”She continued, “The whole back side is all demolished. I saw two 20-foot sections getting busted up because the winds are so strong and powerful.”Despite warnings to evacuate ahead of the powerful storm, Cellucci said she and her husband made the decision to stay home.“With having five kids and my husband’s stuck at work on standby for his job at the hospital it was just easier for us to stay at our home where we have all of our things,” Cellucci said. “We have a safe place here at our home and a generator and we have supplies, so we felt that we could be safe here just riding it out.”But when she and her kids lost power at 3 a.m., she said she began to worry.Although her husband showed her how to turn on the generator before he left for his job at the hospital, she couldn’t get it started on the first try and she and her children were without power for hours.“When the wind picked up it got really spooky and scary. I really didn’t get any sleep, I needed to be up in case anything happened,” she said.But she was “thankfully” able to get the generator started on her second try, it started just now on the second try,” Cellucci said midmorning Friday.Her husband has called to check in on the family “several times” as well as to assure her that he is safe, she said.“He told me how the hospital felt like it was swaying from the high winds since they have all the EMS personnel in his crew staying on a high floor at the hospital,” Cellucci said. “But they are all still on lockdown.”The family has experienced just one other hurricane in their North Carolina home when Hurricane Matthew hit in 2016.“This is our second hurricane. We’re not from down here; we moved down here three years ago from Michigan,” Cellucci said.“It’s kind of new to us what a hurricane would mean so our anxiety was high getting stuff ready,” she added. Cellucci told ABC News in an earlier interview on Thursday night that the family was already feeling the force of Florence.“The rain’s really picked up, and just stepping outside a little bit ago the trees are really blowing and bending. We have large pine trees in our backyard, and they’re really bending a lot,” she told “Nightline” anchor Juju Chang on Thursday night. “The wind is howling away. I could hear it from inside the house.”Cellucci said her children were “wound up from the excitement of the storm,” Thursday evening but eventually “got tired and fell asleep.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Suicidal woman tries to open plane door mid-flight: Source

first_imgiStock/Jetlinerimages(NEW YORK) — A suicidal woman tried to open the door of a Delta Airlines flight Friday afternoon, but the plane managed to land safely, a law enforcement source said.According to the source, the woman made comments about wanting to take her life aboard Delta Airlines flight 5935, from Raleigh-Durham to LaGuardia Airport in New York.She then allegedly tried unsuccessfully to open an emergency door.The flight landed safely at LaGuardia, where the woman was taken off the flight.Authorities stressed that regardless of what the woman tried to do, the aircraft door was designed not to open mid-flight because positive pressure inside the cabin will not allow the door to open.“We’re aware of the social media report related to the flight and are looking into it,” Republic Airways, which operated the flight, said in a statement. “But what I can tell you now is that the flight landed uneventfully and proceeded to its gate.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Room at the top -for improvement

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Room at the top -for improvementOn 1 Nov 2001 in Personnel Today Companydirectors seem to be missing out on self development. Patrick McCurry looks atthe reasons why and the potential remediesIt is a continuing anomaly of working life that most professions, fromaccountants and lawyers to bus drivers, need specific training and aqualification to do their jobs, but that anyone can become a company directorwithout any training at all. However, the need is clearly there. A recent survey by leadershipconsultancy Skai revealed that neither senior business leaders nor boardmembers feel that they are adding value to the business. And, frighteningly, 60per cent of the board members believe that employees don’t think they add valueeither. The good news is that the growing emphasis on corporate governance,increasing legislation in the workplace and the challenges of a fast-movingbusiness environment are encouraging more organisations to set up trainingprogrammes for board members. Nevertheless, change is slow and many directors say they don’t have the timefor training because they’re too busy running their businesses. That may be true for some, but only because they haven’t properly structuredtheir organisations so that directors can step back from daily operations. Forothers, the likely explanation is that they don’t feel they need development orthey’re scared of it. “A lot of directors are afraid of training because they don’t want tobe exposed – they think that as directors they should know everything,”says Brett Williams, who is setting up a subsidiary of the financial servicescompany Old Mutual. Williams has been working with Skai Associates to make sure board membersunderstand their responsibilities to take a strategic view of the whole companyrather than becoming immersed in their departments. “Too often, directors spend board meetings defending their turf ratherthan contributing to the wider strategy,” he complains. In many ways, however, there has never been a better time to promotedirector training. The numerous inquiries into corporate governance in the1990s, following the business scandals such as the Maxwell pension fund, led toa combined code that includes a requirement on listed companies to implementdirector training. But that code, whose enforcement has moved from the London Stock Exchange tothe Financial Services Authority, is voluntary. Pressures Apart from the combined code, there are other pressures on companies to taketraining more seriously, notably the increasingly complex employment law inareas like working time and discrimination. Last July, the Health and Safety Commission issued new guidance ondirectors’ responsibilities and the government is proposing a law on corporatemanslaughter which would mean directors could face life imprisonment ifcollective negligence by the board led to a death. An HSC spokesman says, “Some companies have very good records on theawareness of directors on health and safety issues, but some are very poor,which is reflected in the growing cases of courts handing out big fines.” But there seems little prospect of mandatory training or induction fordirectors, such as in countries like Singapore, where directors of listedcompanies must have undergone some form of training in issues like directors’responsibilities. On the other hand, there has been a significant increase in the number ofdirectors taking courses such as the Institute of Directors’ diploma, and 18months ago the IoD launched its rigorous chartered director programme, which itbelieves is the first of its kind in the world. According to the IoD, there has been an increase in the number of directorstaking its courses, up from about 3,000 three years ago to 3,500 today. Around300 take the full company direction diploma, which typically consists of 15days spread over nine to 15 months. Complacency John Weston, head of the IoD’s director development, argues that complacencyamong directors that they don’t need training and development is being chippedaway at, although he acknowledges that lack of time is a barrier. “That’s why we often run courses of a day or half-day because we knowit’s just not possible for many directors to find the time for a residentialprogramme,” he says. While the UK could be argued to be going too slow on director development,it is still ahead of many other countries. In the US, for example, directortraining is less developed than in the UK, says IoD professional standardsexecutive Chris Pierce. Indeed, the IoD has been hired by Japan’s Management Association to delivercourses there. “Japan has been going through a number of controversialbusiness failures, as the UK did in the early 1990s, and they’re eager to learnabout corporate governance from us,” says Pierce. Comparisons with the rest of Europe are harder to make, he says, as thestructure of boards there, including the representation of workers onsupervisory boards, is very different to the UK model. Of course, the training needs of different kinds of directors in the UK maybe different. A board member on a plc is likely to have far more formaleducation than a director of a smaller, family-owned company. Pierce says, “A FTSE director may have an MBA but seek training toimprove his or her influencing skills at board meetings, while a director of asmall company may have entrepreneurial skills but lack wider businessknowledge.” He adds that when many managers are promoted to director, “they thinkit just means a better car parking space” and don’t realise the legal andfiduciary responsibilities they’re taking on. Liability Directors face personal liability in areas such as a company trading whileinsolvent or for negligence under the Company Directors Disqualification Act,which can lead to a director being banned from management for 15 years. “There are hefty penalties for directors found to be negligent, butsome board members aren’t sufficiently aware of this,” says Pierce. According to Kate Lidbetter, director of consultancy Skai Associates, it isimportant that training and development of board members is done from a teamapproach. “We try to work with boards rather than individual directors, toget them to agree collectively on what they’re trying to achieve rather thanbeing sidetracked into firefighting departmental problems all the time,”she says. Skai has been facilitating workshops with the board of Old Mutual’s newsubsidiary in which directors are encouraged to look at the company’s visionand how that can be achieved by taking a step back from their departmentalfunctions. Plans for learningWhat the Chartered Director Programme contains:The reputation of many company directors has taken a batteringin recent years, following financial scandals and controversy over “fatcat” remuneration.In an attempt to inspire greater public confidence in boardmembers, the Institute of Directors formally launched a Chartered Director Programme18 months ago covering business skills such as finance, marketing and strategyas well as corporate governance.Directors who want CDir after their names must sign up to theIoD’s code of professional conduct. As well as requiring directors to serve thelegitimate interests of shareholders, it states they must exerciseresponsibility to other stakeholders and avoid anti-competitive practices andconflicts of interest.According to the leader of the programme Simon Bull, gainingthe Charter is not just a way of reassuring the public of the probity ofdirectors but can also bring business benefits.”There have been a lot of stories of rogue directorsfleecing companies and the Charter qualification can help directors in theirdealings with their investors, lenders and other suppliers of services,” Bullsays.So far, around 100 directors have been awarded or are about togain Charter Status and some 600 directors have passed the initial exam.The training does not end when chartered status is gained asthere is a continuing development programme, for which Chartered Directors mustrecord their progress.Have they got what it takes?A guide to the five key attributesneeded by directors1 Strategic thinking: Too manydirectors get bogged down in their function and can’t see the wood for thetrees when it comes to the company’s objectives2 Communication: Knowing how to negotiate with and influenceother board members, as well as communicating the company’s vision with staff.Knowing how to deal with the media and City analysts is also an increasinglyimportant skill3 Knowledge of legal responsibilities: Directors face evergreater responsibilities in areas like employment law and health and safety.Negligence in these areas can lead to severe penalties for the firm and, insome cases, for directors personally4 Understanding other functions: Directors need to know thebasics of all functions, from finance and marketing to HR and sales5 Leadership: In an increasingly competitive and volatileeconomic environment, directors must be able to inspire their staff and wintrust. 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BT growth strategy relies on flexibility

Comments are closed. BT growth strategy relies on flexibilityOn 9 Apr 2002 in Personnel Today Growth is the aim of BT’s new business strategy and the firm is evolving itswork-life balance practices to recruit and retain the best staff to achieve it.John Steele, group personnel director of BT, told Personnel Today that thereis a strong business case for the expansion of work-life practices. The telecoms giant currently has 60,000 mobile workers, 9,000 part-timersand 5,000 home workers among its 115,000 staff, and has saved more than £220mon real estate and related costs, claimed Steele. “We’ve progressed work-life balance over the years with a set ofprogressive and yet pragmatic policies – we always ask ourselves if it addsvalue to the business,” said Steele, ahead of BT’s Work-life Balance Weekand conference (8-12 April). But it is not just about making cost savings. “The newer people cominginto the workforce don’t want to live to work – they want to work tolive,” said Steele. “If you want to be a successful, sustainable and long-term company, youhave to get the best talent. This will only be achieved by fishing in thebroadest pool possible and creating a work-life balance approach.” BT is expanding two programmes that will greatly increase its staff’sability to work flexibly. The Freedom to Work initiative allows staff to determine their own workpatterns and has grown from a trial among 18 staff in 1998 to more than 12,000employees today. Staff can work flexibly in a number of different ways,including the completion of full hours over four days, periodic home working orworking longer hours for a period to accrue non-working time. The initiative was set up to tackle the culture of ‘presenteeism’ at BT andSteele intends to extend this programme to include more BT staff. Steele, who is to retire in three months after more than ten years in therole, said: “It has been the genesis of individual work patterns. Wewanted people to tell us what patterns they wanted to work. Staff have turneddown other work opportunities as they want the flexibility we have given themto do their work.” The firm is also set to launch a performance-related-pay scheme for customerservice engineers, which aims to extend its work-life balance practices into bluecollar roles. Steele, 59, wants to roll out BT’s new self-motivated teams concept in earlysummer to 25,000 staff. It will reward staff for performance rather thanattendance, and enable parents to spend more time with their families. Customer service engineers, who fit and repair BT products in homes andbusinesses, have traditionally topped up their salaries through overtime. Butengineers in self-motivated teams will be now able to accumulate points forhigh performance that will translate into additional payments to their basicsalary. Points can be accumulated on an individual and team basis for the number ofjobs completed, quality of work and improvements in customer satisfaction,among other things. A successful 13-week trial of the profit-related pay system by 5,500 fieldengineers ended in March, and Steele claimed that it boosted productivity by 5per cent and quality of service by 8 per cent. During the trial engineers also worked two hours less each week and earnedmore, Steele added. Unions are currently consulting with members. “The people who missed out on overtime because of family commitmentswill now be able to earn more money by performing better and having theopportunity to do more in the time available,” he said. A key challenge for Steele has been to ensure that the work-life balancepractices support the company’s business strategy. In 2001, the companysuffered pre-tax losses of more than £1bn. He explained that the company hasreduced its debt to “more reasonable levels”, restructured and heldthe largest rights issue ever in the UK. “We’re now in a phase where our new CEO, Ben Verwaayen, is looking forgrowth and the key principle is customer satisfaction and service. “What we’re trying to do from a people point of view is get staff withthe right skills and right attitude. We want a can-do attitude with peopleprepared to take commercial risks where appropriate and be prepared to do whatis right for the customer.” BT has to recruit people from a “diverse set of backgrounds andexperiences” to achieve these capabilities. Steele explained: “If youwant to create opportunities for a diverse population then you have to havework-life balance.” By Mike Broad Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Article read more