Dottin hoping to hit top form for Brisbane

first_imgBRISBANE, Australia (CMC):West Indies Women’s star Deandra Dottin is backing herself to hit the straps for Brisbane Heat in the Women’s Big Bash League starting later this month.The all-rounder turned out for Perth Scorchers in the inaugural season last year, but failed to make an impression in six outings, scoring just 75 runs and taking five wickets.However, Dottin believes she can be a major asset in all departments for the Heat in the upcoming campaign, which runs from December 10 until January 28 next year.”I want to be way better than last year. I can’t really say much about last season because it was a rush,” said the 25-year-old.”I’ve come to do my best as usual – batting and bowling and helping the team to get as far as [they] can.”Dottin is already in camp with the Heat and has been impressing management with her energy in the nets.She will campaign alongside the likes of Australia internationals Beth Mooney, Delissa Kimmince and Jessica Jonassen.DECENT FORMBarbadian Dottin has been in decent form of recent, managing a half-century against India Women in a three-match one-day series in Vijayawada last month, while also picking up a few wickets.She was a key member of the Caribbean side that won the Twenty20 World Cup in India last April, scoring 129 runs from six games and taking nine wickets with her medium pace.Overall, Dottin has scored 1805 and taken 39 wickets in 91 T20 Internationals.She shot to stardom six years ago when she became the first woman cricketer to score a century in the Twenty20 World Cup.The right-hander still holds the record for the fastest T20I hundred off just 38 balls.last_img read more

Surging Hotshots win 3rd straight, gain share of top spot

first_imgJapeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college Romeo Travis recorded a double-double with 32 points and 14 rebounds with seven assists to boot while Mark Barroca was a spark off the bench with 16 points on 7-of-10 shooting from the field and three steals.“This is a very important game for us. I told my players whatever our mindset was against San Miguel and Rain or Shine, we need to have it against Columbian because we cant afford to relax. we need to finish strong,” said Magnolia head coach Chito Victolero.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissRiding high after a pair of impressive wins over Rain or Shine last Wednesday and San Miguel Beer on Sunday, Magnolia went to work early and never letup behind Travis’ solid play on both ends and its slew of guards in Barroca, Paul Lee and Jio Jalalon.The Hotshots, who shot a blistering 51 percent clip from the field and had 31 assists, doubled a 14-point halftime lead with Robbie Herndon’s layup off a Jalalon dish making it, 77-49, with 7:11 remaining in the third quarter. LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title MOST READ Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Lee, who averaged 25 points in his last two games, didn’t need to score as much this time but still played a key role. He wound up with 13 points, five rebounds and two assists while Jalalon scattered six points, three rebounds, nine assists and two steals.The Dyip’s misery continued as they reeled to their seventh straight setback in as many games. Jackson Corpuz had 20 points and nine rebounds while Akeem Wright added 19 points and eight rebounds for Columbian.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next PBA IMAGESStreaking Magnolia scored eight unanswered points from the opening tip to cruise to a 113-95 trouncing of Columbian in the 2018 PBA Governors’ Cup Wednesday at Smart Araneta Coliseum.The Hotshots, who chalked up their third consecutive win, gained a share of the lead with the Barangay Ginebra Gin Kings in the standings at 5-1.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil View comments Interim boss sole candidate for AIBA boxing presidency Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anewlast_img read more

More Fireballs Spotted

first_imgIf there were little green men, visiting the Hudson’s Hope area, in the early morning hours of November 20th, chances are they were in Alberta at the end of last week.Following the flash and bang reports in the sky over Beryl Prairie west of Hudson’s Hope, comes word, of more fireball sightings in the Edmonton area.The first were reported to the east and northeast, of the Alberta capital, early last Thursday.   A second set of reports was then received, early Friday, but these involved sitings to the west of the city.- Advertisement -A spokesman for the Telus World of Science says more records are needed, before an analysis can be conducted to determine what was involved.However, if they are little green men in space ships, they either get around in hurry, or there are a number of them now visiting our planet, because there have been other sitings in the past week, in Utah and South Africa.last_img read more

Conte poised to replace Spalletti as Inter Milan coach

first_img0Shares0000Antonio Conte won three straight Serie A titles with Juventus and a Premier League title with Chelsea © AFP/File / Glyn KIRKMILAN, Italy, May 27 – Former Italy coach Antonio Conte is poised to replace Luciano Spalletti as coach of Inter Milan, according to reports in Italy on Monday.Spalletti sealed Inter’s Champions League berth for a second consecutive year with a 2-1 win over Empoli on the final day of the Serie A season Sunday. Inter snatched fourth place, equal on points with Atalanta, but behind the side from Bergamo on head-to-head difference, to edge city rivals AC Milan by just one point in the race for elite European football.But multiple reports state that the 60-year-old former Roma and Zenit St Petersburg coach will be axed in favour of ex-Juventus, Chelsea and ‘Azzurri’ boss Conte.Gazzetta dello Sport said “total agreement” had been reached with 49-year-old Conte, with Corriere dello Sport and Sky Sport Italia reporting a three-year deal would be sealed before the end of the week.Spalletti conceded his future was uncertain, despite returning the club to the Champions League after a seven-year absence this season, where they were knocked out at the group stage.“This result (against Empoli) changes little. The club will talk now and I will listen, just as you will,” Spalletti said after Sunday’s game.“I would like to continue to coach Inter. The newspapers have had the same headlines for three months, so we’ll see what happens.”Conte has also been linked with a return to champions Juventus, after his successor in Turin Massimiliano Allegri was removed, and AS Roma where Claudio Ranieri has been the interim coach since the sacking of Eusebio Di Francesco in March.Conte won the first three of Juventus’ eight straight Serie A titles and the Premier League and FA Cup with Chelsea.0Shares0000(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

Antelope Valley Calendar

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl event40 and Up Singles dance, 6:30-10:30 p.m. Sunday at Lancaster Elks Lodge, 240 E. Ave. K, Lancaster. Admission: $5 members, $7 nonmembers. Call (661) 949-9467. Life Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the second Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with ID are admitted free. Teen Care and Support Group, for teens who have lost a family member or friend, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian School, 1011 E. Ave. I, Room 302, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 1 p.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Revealing Truth, a meditation and spiritual discussion, 4:45-6:15 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Antelope Valley Chess Club will meet, 1-5 p.m. at American Legion Post 771, 39463 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 726-1323. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. Overeaters Anonymouswill meet, 5-6 p.m. at 44960 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 789-5806. MONDAY Beyond the Light, a socialization and support group for young adults, ages 17 1/2 to 25, with mental health issues, will meet, noon-1 p.m. at Transitional Youth Services, 104 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Dance Groove will give ballroom and Latin dance lessons, 6-8:30 p.m. Dance Groove Studio, 43631 10th St. W., Lancaster. Cost: $5 per person. Call (661) 948-9101. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927. 12 Step Recovery Groups for alcohol and drug addiction, co-dependency, relationship addiction, overeating, fear and anxiety issues, meets, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. The Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale will host bingo, 5:30 p.m. The grill will be open. Call (661) 947-2027. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 722-0393. Co-Dependents Anonymous will host a 12-step recovery program, 7:30-9 p.m., at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927 or (661) 946-5846. Grief Recovery Outreach Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or visit www.frf.av.org. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. The Highs and Lows, a support group for those diagnosed with manic depression or related disorders, will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Al-Anon will have a discussion, 7 p.m. at 51st Street West and Avenue K, Lancaster. Child care provided. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 572 will meet, 9-11 a.m. at the Mayflower Gardens chapel, 6570 W. Ave. L-12, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 943-3089. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6 p.m. with regular games beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-2027. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6:30 p.m. with regular games beginning at 7 p.m. at Paraclete High School, 42145 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3255, Monday evenings: (661) 943-1017. Billiard Gang for seniors will meet, 9:15 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Parent support group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. The facilitated group is for parents who need help coping with family issues. Call (661) 266-8700. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 273-1016. Expectant parents can tour the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department, 1600 W. Ave. J in Lancaster, and get information on what to expect during hospitalization, at sessions starting at 6 p.m. Visitors meet in the main lobby. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. TUESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club weekly league bowling, 6-8 p.m. at Sands Bowl, 43323 Sierra Highway, Lancaster. Call (661) 267-2586. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Information and location: Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Business Network International B2 Bombers chapter will meet, 12:15 p.m. at Eduardo’s restaurant, 819 W. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 609-1288 or e-mail audmill@qnet.com. The organization’s Web site is at www.bni-scav.com. Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Susan Baker at (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Successful Anger Management course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Call (661) 538-1846. Sand Creek Orators, Toastmaster International meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Hummel Hall, 2200 20th St. W., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Caregiver Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. in Conference Room 1 at Lancaster Community Hospital in Lancaster. Sponsored by ProCare Hospice. Call (661) 951-1146. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Rocketeers Toastmasters meets, 1:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Call Pam Raneri (661) 275-5287. Pancho Barnes Composite Squadron 49, Civil Air Patrol, will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. at Rosamond Sky Park, 4171 Knox Ave., Rosamond. Call (760) 373-5771. Antelope Valley Archaeology Club will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5656. Grief Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hoffmann Hospice, 1832 W. Ave. K, Suite D-1. Call (661) 948-8801. Toastmasters Sand Creek Orators Club meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 2500 Orange St., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Snyders Dance Groove meets, 6-8:30 p.m. the first and second Tuesdays of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $2. Call (661) 609-6510. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) meets, 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month for brunch, speakers and crafts at Central Christian Church, 3131 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Cost: $6 per meeting, plus $2 per child for child care. Scholarships are available. Call (661) 945-7902. 12 Step Recovery Group for alcohol and drug addiction will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. American Indian Little League will meet, 7 p.m. at HomeTown Buffet, 422 W. Ave. P. Call Harry Richard at (661) 267-2259. High Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Denny’s restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (760) 240-4705. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Youth Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE, or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Plane Talk Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Lockheed Federal Credit Union, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale. Call (661) 572-4123. Harmony Showcase Chorus of Sweet Adelines International will rehearse, 7:30 p.m. at 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. The group is part of an international organization of women who sing four-part harmony. Call (661) 273-0995, (661) 285-1797 or (661) 940-3109. Al-Anon will hold a discussion, noon at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale, and at 7 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Room 704, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiards Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program representative will be available, 1-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551 for an appointment. Tumbleweed Card Club for seniors will play canasta, pinochle and other games, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Line dancing, 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7-8:30 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SUNDAY Nicotine Anonymous will meet, 8-9 p.m. at Seventh-day Adventist Church, 43824 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 946-7606. Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity) Seniors’ Social Hour, 4-7 p.m. the first Sunday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Meetings feature films, talks, singalongs, talent shows and dancing. Call (661) 723-7876 or (661) 726-5309. Costume Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the fourth Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with identification are admitted free. last_img read more

Tottenham tipped to launch €50m move for Barcelona star

first_img REVEALED 1 LATEST moving on Kevin De Bruyne ‘loves Man City and wants to keep winning’, reveals father targets Cavani ‘agrees’ to join new club and will complete free transfer next summer Latest Transfer News Tony Cascarino backs Everton to sign two strikers for Carlo Ancelotti IN DEMAND RANKED Where every Premier League club needs to strengthen in January center_img Tottenham boss Mauricio Pochettino is reportedly still a big fan of Malcom despite missing out on him in the summer.He would love to bring him to north London and now a deal seems like a real possibility.Malcom is also said to be attracting strong interest from clubs in Italy, specifically Inter Milan. Tottenham are reportedly preparing a sensational £44million swoop for Barcelona forward Malcom.The Brazilian moved to the Spanish champions in the summer from Bordeaux in a deal worth £36.5m. Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade Before that, the 21-year-old was linked with Arsenal, Roma and Tottenham after scoring 12 goals in Ligue 1 last season.Since making the move to Barca, Malcom has struggled for action and he has made just two appearances this season.That has led to reports growing that the Brazilian could be allowed to leave the club already – if they can make a profit on him.And, according to Diario Sport, Spurs are now ready to weigh in with a huge offer of €50m (£44m). targets LIVING THE DREAM The biggest market value losers in 2019, including Bale and ex-Liverpool star Arsenal transfer news LIVE: Ndidi bid, targets named, Ozil is ‘skiving little git’ Malcom has yet to make a major impact at the Nou Camp, and could be set for an early exit Man United joined by three other clubs in race for Erling Haaland last_img read more

PRINGLE BACKS DOWN SYNDROME BILL BUT WARNS: ‘GOVERNMENT MUST STICK TO ITS WORD’

first_imgDONEGAL TD Thomas Pringle has welcomed the opposition Bill that has been accepted by government that would give recognition to Down Syndrome as a ‘low incidence disorder’, but has called for everyone involved to keep battling on to ensure the government sticks by its word.“This Bill by Independent Finian McGrath is vital to ensuring that when recognising this condition as a ‘low incidence disorder’, meaning disorders that automatically qualify for resource teaching hours, that quality educational provision is provided for these children in mainstream schools.“As a member of the ‘All Party Group for Supports in Mainstream School for Children with Down Syndrome’ I am committed to this issue, and from speaking to concerned parents in Donegal on a regular basis I understand the implications of not having Down Syndrome recognised as a low incidence disorder, and the urgent need for these children to receive resource teaching hours so that their specific educational needs may be addressed. “Currently for Down Syndrome children with mild learning disabilities, special needs teaching comes from set hours each school must share out to all pupils with less severe learning difficulties. This causes many complications, as was noted by the report from Children’s Ombudsman Emily Logan last May when she criticised the department’s response to previous complaints about the policy.“I have been working on this issue for some time and have pressed Minister Quinn and the National Council for Special Education on this issue many times. Time after time I was informed that as highlighted in the National Council for Special Education’s report on ‘Supporting Children with Special Educational Needs in Schools’ which was published last May, children should be allocated additional resources in line with their level of need, rather than by disability category. This effectively means that Down Syndrome should not be recognised as a low incidence disorder.“In some ways I welcome the direction that has been taken in this regard; what I’ve had problems with is the children who are left in the dark while this new approach is being devised, as it certainly won’t happen overnight. That is why I have supported Down Syndrome being recognised as a low incidence disorder. What I fear now is that this Bill may be put on the backburner and I think we all deserve an honest explanation for the change of heart, because right now it seems like a ploy to keep us all quiet.“Down Syndrome Ireland and so many parents nationwide as well as Deputy McGrath, myself and others have worked so hard on this issue, so it’s of vital importance that we continue to fight on and make sure this government puts its money where its mouth is,” stated Pringle  PRINGLE BACKS DOWN SYNDROME BILL BUT WARNS: ‘GOVERNMENT MUST STICK TO ITS WORD’ was last modified: February 7th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:BillDail EireannDown SyndromeThomas Pringle TDlast_img read more

Soldiers suspect bomb, open fire on civilian car

first_img On Saturday, police Brig. Gen. Said Ahmed al-Jubouri said the raid was launched after a tip that top al-Qaida operatives, possibly including al-Zarqawi, were in the house. In Moscow, visiting Iraqi Foreign Minister Hohshyar Zebari told Jordan’s official Petra news agency that authorities were testing DNA samples from several corpses to determine whether al-Zarqawi was among them. But U.S. officials avoided linking al-Zarqawi to the Mosul raid and sought to dispel speculation that the terror mastermind was dead. “I don’t believe that we got him. Of course, his days are numbered, we are after him, we are getting ever closer,” Khalilzad said. ,160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! BAGHDAD, Iraq – U.S. soldiers fired on a civilian vehicle Monday because they feared it might hold a suicide bomber, killing at least two adults and a child northeast of the capital, American and Iraqi officials said. The troops fired on the car because it was moving erratically outside a U.S. base in Baqouba, 35 miles from Baghdad, said Maj. Steven Warren, a U.S. spokesman. “It was one of these regrettable, tragic incidents,” Warren said. Dr. Ahmed Fouad at the city morgue and police officials gave a higher death toll, saying five people – including three children – were killed while driving home from a funeral. Iraqi officials have long complained about American troops firing at civilian vehicles that appear suspicious. U.S. officials note that suicide car bombers often strike U.S. and Iraqi checkpoints. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals The shooting took place in a province that has experienced at least four major bombings in the past three weeks – including a suicide car bomb Monday that missed U.S. vehicles but killed five civilians outside Baqouba. Mystery continued to surround a firefight that broke out when U.S. and Iraqi forces surrounded a house in the northern city of Mosul that was believed used by members of al-Qaida in Iraq. Eight insurgents and four Iraqi policemen died in the assault, officials said. Iraq’s foreign minister said tests were being done to determine whether the leader of al-Qaida in Iraq, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, died in the raid. And a U.S. government official confirmed that DNA from the insurgents’ bodies had been taken for testing. The official in Washington spoke on condition of anonymity because the investigation is ongoing. However, the U.S. ambassador to Iraq cast doubt on whether al-Zarqawi was killed. “Unfortunately, we did not get him in Mosul,” Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad said of Iraq’s most feared terrorist. The raid took place in a mostly Kurdish area of eastern Mosul where attacks against U.S. and Iraqi forces are less common than in the western, mostly Sunni Arab part of the city. However, U.S. soldiers say many insurgents live in eastern Mosul and launch attacks elsewhere. last_img read more

Permian Extinction Recovery Story Stretches Credibility

first_imgIt goes without saying that Darwin’s theory fits hand in glove with the geological dating scheme, but how reliable is the latter?  The textbook age names – Permian, Triassic, Jurassic, Eocene and all the rest – have taken on their own life as assumed truths.  Every once in awhile, though, papers are published that require heavy doses of credulity to keep the scheme intact.  The Permian extinction is a case in point.  The textbook story is that 80 to 85 percent of marine organisms perished at the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB).  A new kink in the story requires believing that cephalopods, those most affected by the crisis, recovered spectacularly within one million years of the extinction, but everything else took five times as long, as measured by species diversity.    Charles Marshall, the “Master of Disaster” of the Harvard Museum who tackled the Cambrian explosion problem in 2006 by saying that animals evolved because they evolved (04/23/2006), tackled the Permian extinction with David Jacobs of UCLA in Science last week.1  They were commenting on a paper in the same issue by Brayard et al who presented evidence that ammonites (a kind of shelled squid) recovered much faster than everything else.2  The two papers invoked copious amounts of hand-waving to explain the evolutionary difference.  Many statements amount to references to the Stuff Happens Law (i.e., the negation of explanation; see 09/15/2008 commentary).  For instance, Brayard et al entitled their paper, “Good Genes and Good Luck.”  Here are some example quotes from Marshall and Jacobs that cast doubt on scientific confidence in the Permian extinction story, both its causes and its effects:Two hundred and fifty-two million years ago, the Paleozoic Era came to a cataclysmic close with the end-Permian mass extinction, when as much as 85% of readily fossilizable marine species became extinct.  It took 5 million years for the biosphere to begin to recover from the event.  At least this has been the conventional view.  However, on page 1118 of this issue, Brayard et al. show that ceratitid ammonoids (see the figure, panel A) recovered much faster than did most other marine groups, attaining considerable diversity just 1 million years after the mass extinction.  Moreover, these mollusks reached a peak in their diversity at the end of the Early Triassic, when the diversity and body size of most other groups (particularly bivalves and gastropods) was still depressed.The cause of the end-Permian mass extinction has long been controversial.  There is increasing agreement that toxic waters decimated bottom communities in shallow waters, but it remains unclear whether the kill mechanism was hypercapnia (high CO2 levels), euxinia (anoxic water infused with H2S), or something else.  There is even less agreement on what might have caused the toxicity.Whatever the ultimate cause(s) of the extinction, the proximal cause appears to have been the inability of many species to handle the physiological demands of a changed ocean chemistry.  Evidence that conditions remained difficult for 5 million years after the extinctions comes mainly from the observation that the diversity and size of fossil bivalves and gastropods remained low, indicating stressed conditions.  Furthermore, the carbon cycle was unusually volatile, although the exact meaning of this volatility is not understood.The ammonoid data reported by Brayard et al. suggest a much more rapid recovery, at least for part of the biosphere.  Unlike the bottom-dwelling gastropods and bivalves, ammonoids live in the water column.  Thus, Brayard et al.‘s study suggests that conditions in the water column were better than those on the bottom.  Or does it?To better understand the meaning of Brayard et al.’s data, we need to know more about the biology and physiological tolerances of ammonoids in general, and of ceratitids in particular.These species lie deep in the evolutionary trees of living coleoids and living cephalopods, respectively, suggesting that a tolerance for low oxygen was ancestral for living cephalopods.Their Perspectives article did little more than to suggest this and that, and then to say more work needs to be done.  How about the other paper?  Did Brayard et al have anything more solid to lean on?  Keep in mind that classic Darwinian evolution explains diversification as gradual and continuous.One problem has been a lack of absolute age calibration of evolutionary trends across the PTB.It has usually been assumed that the end-Permian mass extinction affected ecological assemblages so deeply that the postcrisis biotic recovery spanned the entire Early Triassic [~5 million years (My)], if not more.The Triassic part of the time series consists of four successive diversity oscillations of declining magnitude, probably primarily shaped by global climatic and oceanographic changes.In the first oscillation…only 1 to 2 My after the PTB, based on the available radiometric ages and associated uncertainties—ammonoid diversity reached values equal to, if not higher than, those for the Permian (~85 sampled genera) and then were followed by still higher values …. This late Early Triassic generic richness is unsurpassed during the Middle and Late Triassic, where diversity oscillated around an average value…close to the Middle Permian maximum.  This rapid recovery less than 2 My after a mass extinction is also seen for Early Jurassic ammonoids.The Early Triassic rapid ammonoid diversification diverges from delayed recovery after the PTB suggested for many benthic groups…. Apparently, recovery rates strongly varied across marine clades, and ammonoids boomed well before the oceanic realm returned to a long-term steady state.Extreme contraction of survivorship and prenascence contour lines is diagnostic of high evolutionary rates, as echoed by the simultaneously high numbers and rates of Early Triassic originations and extinctions (Fig. 3).Ammonoid diversification during the Early Triassic produced more than 200 genera in less than ~5 My and was accompanied by a progressive change from cosmopolitan to latitudinally restricted distributions of genera.This trend was not a gradual, continuous, and smooth one.How did these cephalopods flourish in the presumably unstable and harsh environmental conditions prevailing at that time?  The same question applies to conodonts, whose Early Triassic diversity dynamics tend to parallel that of ammonoids.Ammonoids are morphologically and taxonomically so diverse that it is likely that they occupied a great variety of niches and exploited various food resources.  Their high diversity and abundance suggest that diversified and abundant food resources were already available less than 2 My after the PTB.  Consequently, even if Early Triassic trophic webs were possibly less complex than Permian and Middle-Late Triassic ones, they were far from devastated.  At least some sizeable, while still unknown, primary production made it possible for these two clades to diversify profusely and rapidly despite short-term fluctuations of environmental conditions.The Early-Middle Triassic transition was again marked by a severe drop in ammonoid diversity.  In this case, a fall in global sea level is implicated.In addition, the empirical (log) richness-rates relationships (table S4) illustrate a possible niche incumbency effect.  This hypothesis, which predicts that richness and extinction rates are independent, allows the estimate of an average steady-state generic niche saturation level of ~85% under the hierarchical model, compatible with species niche saturation levels previously published for various clades of marine organisms.Numerous Lazarus taxa3 among benthic and pelagic mollusks reappear during the Smithian.Coupled with the Triassic ammonoid nondelayed diversity dynamics evidenced here, this suggests that complex trophic webs based on abundant and diversified primary producers were already functioning less than 2 My after the PTB and opens the possibility that heterotrophic taxa other than ammonoids also rapidly recovered.This phased scenario for the Triassic biotic recovery accounts well for its generally accepted delayed character, which may reflect still inadequate sampling and time resolution and/or biased diversity estimates due to the lack of sampling standardization in the first million years after the PTB.Recoveries obviously show environment- and clade-specific dynamics.  Nevertheless, our results indicate that the time duration of the post-PTB recovery is likely overestimated, at least for some marine taxa.It should be noted that the statistics of biodiversity on which they relied for their graphs and charts depend heavily on sampling – a human enterprise.  The fossils, in other words, do not speak for themselves.  This was clear from several paragraphs in the paper that explained why Brayard et al leaned on some data sets but rejected others.1.  Charles R. Marshall and David K. Jacobs, “Paleontology: Flourishing After the End-Permian Mass Extinction,” Science, 28 August 2009: Vol. 325. no. 5944, pp. 1079-1080, DOI: 10.1126/science.1178325.2.  Brayard, Escargue, Bucher, Monnet, Br�hwiler, Goudemand, Galfetti, and Guex, “Good Genes and Good Luck: Ammonoid Diversity and the End-Permian Mass Extinction,” Science,28 August 2009: Vol. 325. no. 5944, pp. 1118-1121, DOI: 10.1126/science.1174638.3.  Lazarus taxa: resurrected extinct groups or “living fossils” – see 03/10/2006 and 12/04/2007.Who else but CEH is revealing, line by line, in detail, the arbitrariness of story generation in the evolutionary scientific literature?  The Framework is never called into question, no matter how many anomalies are found, and no matter how many suspensions of disbelief are required.  The Stuff Happens Law is everywhere – “good genes and good luck.”  There is no pattern or sense to any of this.  Here is the story in a nutshell:Through causes we don’t understand, something happened at some uncalibrated time, and, if our sampling methods are not completely biased, some groups of animals, based on some method of deciding what constitutes a species or genus among extinct animals we cannot observe except by their shells, using controversial measures of classification and sampling, recovered much faster than others, through reasons we also don’t understand, perhaps due to their level in the water column, or climate, or availability of food, or tolerance to carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide, or a number of other possibilities.  This points out that their evolutionary potential, whatever that means, was greater than that of shellfish, because of mechanisms not well understood, i.e., some sizeable, while still unknown, primary production that made it possible for ammonites and conodonts to diversify profusely and rapidly compared to their depressed contemporaries, despite rapid fluctuations and oscillations in their environment, illustrating their ability to occupy a variety of ecological niches, though stressed by the unknown extinction event of unknown duration or cause–perhaps volcanoes, which surprisingly killed almost everything on the sea floor (which one would think more robust against calamities in the climate or on the surface, but whatever).  Yet some of them, nevertheless, somehow, resurrected like Lazarus (but we don’t want this to get anyone started thinking about the Bible or miracles, which is forbidden; only Darwinian miracles are allowed).  So whatever the cause, or causes, or no cause at all, while all we have is confusing data and a Framework to put it in bequeathed to us by Saint Lyell, we at least came up with a “scenario”, illustrated with a few graphs and charts and math, that was good enough to get published by the Keepers of the Darwinian Flame in Science, even though we diverged a little bit from Saint Darwin’s concept of gradual, smooth, continuous change, because we know his heirs have become more tolerant of unexplained hiccups in the geological record, or the biological record, or in evolutionary theory itself, because of the need to keep Evolution reigning supreme in the public eye, by sounding sophisticated with terms like “diversity dynamics” (which we don’t have to define or explain), but that doesn’t matter because it sounds scholarly, and helps to keep at bay the constant threat from those rascally Creationists, who might expose our methods and threaten our jobs and funding unless we present a unified front and an air of confidence in the journals and cooperative science news outlets.Abbreviated version:  Something happened.  We’re not sure what, when, or how, or why, or even if something happened at all, but some day we may figure it out.  Praise Darwin for modern science!Welcome to modern evolutionary biology.  Stuff happens.  Evolution happens.  Diversity happens.  Niches magically get filled.  Rates of change vary with no known reason.  Facts are convenient props, but keeping the Framework intact while weaving more intricate stories is the name of the game.  Don’t even THINK about criticizing us.  We are scientists.  Don’t even think.(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more