WI Women, India in crucial clash

first_img Even if they win but England lose, the Caribbean side will finish in a three-way tie with England and Pakistan Women on six points, with net run rate deciding the two semi-finalists. This nerve-racking scenario is one captain Stafanie Taylor is desperately hoping to avoid. “I think we are very much confident. We know what we need to improve on. We worked really hard at training today and I think the girls are ready,” she said yesterday. “We just have to try and outsmart the Indians because we know they are going to come with spinners, so we just have to be ready.” West Indies Women have been let down by their batting in the tournament. In the last game against England in Dharamsala, they could only muster 108 for four off their 20 overs, but they bowled and fielded magnificently to almost successfully defend the total. Taylor, her side’s most dependable batsman, said a bigger effort was needed from the batsmen today. “We need to see some positives in the batting. The bowlers have been doing so well and I think we need to help out the bowlers. We need to put some runs on the board so the bowlers can have something to bowl at,” she urged. Taylor admitted that the narrow defeat to England Women had hurt. She said that after reducing England from 59 without loss in the ninth over to come within a wicket and one delivery of victory, missing out had been difficult to absorb. nerve-racking scenario MOHALI, India (CMC): West Indies Women will seek to banish the disappointment of their defeat to England Women last week when they take on hosts India Women in a virtual must-win game in the Women’s Twenty20 World Cup here today. After starting the tournament with two straight wins to top Group B, they stumbled in a heart-wrenching last ball defeat on Thursday, to tumble into second spot alongside Pakistan Women on four points. West Indies Women must now ensure they beat India Women and hope England also defeat the Pakistanis in order to clinch a semi-final spot outright.last_img read more

Mars Madness Hits

first_imgBedrock at this site added to a puzzle about ancient Mars by indicating that a lake was present, but that little carbon dioxide was in the air to help keep a lake unfrozen.Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS, Feb 6, 2017The dilemma has been building for years, the Mars rover scientists say. From the photos, scientists see evidence of river channels and lakebeds on Mars, but chemically, the rocks don’t match. Dissolved CO2 in water helps minerals like iron and magnesium precipitate into carbonate rock. Orbiters and rovers have been unable to find carbonates above a low threshold.“We’ve been particularly struck with the absence of carbonate minerals in sedimentary rock the rover has examined,” said Thomas Bristow of NASA’s Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. “It would be really hard to get liquid water even if there were a hundred times more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than what the mineral evidence in the rock tells us.” Bristow is the principal investigator for the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) instrument on Curiosity and lead author of the study being published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.So far, no scenario rescues the disparate observations. It doesn’t appear the liquid water was under frozen lakes, or underground.“Curiosity’s traverse through streambeds, deltas, and hundreds of vertical feet of mud deposited in ancient lakes calls out for a vigorous hydrological system supplying the water and sediment to create the rocks we’re finding,” said Curiosity Project Scientist Ashwin Vasavada of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. “Carbon dioxide, mixed with other gases like hydrogen, has been the leading candidate for the warming influence needed for such a system. This surprising result would seem to take it out of the running.“The article leaves the dilemma unanswered. The paper is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) this week.Let the scientists explain the geology before they launch into speculations about life. Remember, too, that the scientists were baffled and discouraged by widespread evidence of life-hindering salts and perchlorates on the surface (10/02/15). Why would lakebeds persist for billions of years on a planet frequently disturbed by global duststorms? If the moyboys would cure their obsession with millions of years and billions of years, maybe it would lead to new avenues of explanation. The Curiosity rover is sending back photos of things mission scientists are struggling to understand.It looks like there was standing water on Mars, but geologists can’t picture any circumstances where large amounts of water could have survived for long. The sun should have been cooler, for one thing, in the early years of the solar system. Another curiosity is that Curiosity (the name of the Mars Science Mission rover), has failed to find evidence of carbonates on the surface, yet those would be expected if Mars had more carbon dioxide in the past to act as a greenhouse gas to keep the surface warm enough for liquid water. These paradoxes, NASA’s Curiosity page says, make “climate modelers struggle to produce scenarios that get the surface of Mars warm enough for keeping water unfrozen.” (Visited 81 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Budget airlines break the billion-passenger barrier.

first_imgLow-cost carriers for the first time carried more than a billion passengers in 2016,  with new figures showing they accounted  for 28 per cent of the 3.7 billion passengers who boarded scheduled services worldwide.Budget airlines helped fuel a global passenger growth of 6 per cent — slightly slower than the previous year’s 7.1 per cent —  and in some markets are now carrying almost a third of all passengers.Figures released by the United Nations-backed International Civil Aviation Organisation show that LCC’s now account for 32 per cent of all passengers carried in Europe, 31 per cent in the Asia-Pacific and 25 per cent in North America.The figures underscore the rising importance of budget carriers over the past decade and their impact on the industry as a whole. “The increasing presence of low-cost carriers notably in emerging economies (has)  contributed to the overall growth of passenger traffic,’’ ICAO said.The number of global scheduled airline departures rose to 35 million in 2016 as more than half the world’s international tourists travelled across borders by air and the industry accounted for 35 per cent of world trade.Sluggish growth in advanced economies, low commodity prices, weak global trade and diminishing capital growth contributed to a lower than expected global gross domestic product (GDP) of 2.4 per cent. GDP and aviation growth are closely linked but despite the weak economic conditions, ICAO said global passenger traffic continued to grow “helped by the lower air fares owing to the fall in oil prices’’.International scheduled passenger traffic expressed in the standard airline format of revenue passenger kilometres (RPKs) rose 6.3 per cent down from growth of 7 per cent the previous year.The report said that all regions, except for Africa and the Middle East, posted slower growth than 2015. Europe accounted for the biggest share of RPKs with 36 per cent and posted an increase of 4.3 per cent. The Middle East posted the strongest growth in RPKs of 11.2 per cent, followed by the Asia-Pacific (8 per cent), Latin America and the Caribbean (6.5 per cent), Africa (5.7 per cent) and North America (3.5 per cent).Domestic scheduled services grew by 6.2 percent in 2016, down from 7.3 per cent the previous year. North America, the world’s biggest domestic market accounting for 43 per cent of all RPKs in this category, grew by 4.9 per cent.“Owing to the strong demand in India and China, the Asia-Pacific region grew strongly by 10 per cent in 2016 and accounted for 40 per cent of world domestic scheduled traffic,’’ ICAO  said.Total capacity in available seat kilometres (ASKs) increased globally by around 6.4 per cent and outpaced the increase in passenger traffic. As a result, the overall load factor dropped slightly from 80.4 per cent in 2015 to 80.3 per cent this year. The load factor varied by region and ranged from 68 per cent for Africa to 83.3 per cent for North America. Strong capacity expansion in the Middle east continued to put the region’s load factor under pressure and it was expected to fall to 74.7 per cent in 2016 from 76.3 per cent the previous year.World air freight grew at a slightly quicker rate of 2.6 per cent in 2016 but “remained challenging’’ while low fuel prices helped maintain airline profitability.The industry was expected to end 2016 with a record operating profit of $US60 billion, up $US2 billion on 2015, with a third of all profits coming from North American carriers buoyed by their domestic markets.“Improving economic conditions forecast by the World Bank will see traffic growth and air carrier profitability momentum continuing in 2017,’’ the report said.last_img read more

2017 Farm Journal Midwest Crop Tour – Day 2

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Presented by AgXploreSee Day 1 results from the Farm Journal Midwest Crop TourSee Day 3 results from the Farm Journal Midwest Crop TourSee Day 4 results from the Farm Journal Midwest Crop TourFinal results for the entire eastern leg of this year’s Farm Journal Midwest Crop Tour for Indiana.Corn – 171.23 Bushels to the Acre Soybeans – 1168.78 Pods in a 3 x 3 foot square Today is my annual ride along with Pro Farmer Editor Brian Grete. We have gotten to know each other pretty well over the past 6 years and he does an incredible job making sure this Eastern Leg of the Farm Journal Midwest Crop Tour goes off without a hitch. We have had many one-of-a-kind experiences over the year, including a great hole-in-the-wall BBQ joint (that I hope is still open and on our route today), doing the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge in the middle of a corn field and almost getting killed by a train. Okay, so it wasn’t really that close but the story gets better every year. We have scouts from England and Rotterdam with us today. 3:25 p.m.This is our last stop of the day in McLean County, Illinois and this should be some of the best numbers we will see on the tour because the soil is prime here, but those high numbers will not be seen this year. The ear count was small and the ears continue to shorter than what we have seen earlier in the day. As you can see by the picture, this field was crispy and firing heavily well inside of the field. Our yield estimate is only at 146 bushels. Soybeans here were very level and looked like carpet. Very clean and very healthy. This pod county was 1248, which was just below our route’s Illinois average.McClean County, IllinoisMcClean County, IllinoisMcClean County, Illinois2:13 p.m.Livingston County, Illnois for this stop and ear population was very low here, but the outstanding ears will give us a yield of 186 for this field. Soybeans were very healthy in the field across the road and each plant had a least 50 pods on them. Pod count here was 1344 in a 3 foot square.Livingston County, IlinoisLivingston County, Ilinois1:45 p.m.After a great lunch at The Humble Hog in Paxton, Illinois we are back at it in Ford County, Illinois where we saw our first field dicamba drift damage. It was mostly on the outer rows and the beans are looking alright for now. Our pod count in a 3 x 3 foot square was 1656. The corn was pretty standard for what we have seen today, with little disease pressure. Our samples had a 14 around average for our yield calc was 161. Ford County, IllinoisFord County, IllinoisFord County, Illinois12:10 p.m.We are seeing more evidence of a dry growing season here. Zipper ears and a low population will hurt this field this year. There is a heavy aphid infestation here as well as seen on one of the scout’s shirt. This farmer replanted in some areas of the field we were in but none of our sample ears came from those later planted stalks. Our yield number here is 142. Soybeans were podded well and 1194 is our 3 x 3 pod count here.Vermillion County, IllinoisVermillion County, Illinois11:34 a.m.We wondered if this corn was firing badly or just wrapping up production and the answer was a little of both. We talked with some area growers here in Iroquois County, Illinois and the big rain they got over the last day was too much too late. Corn here is showing what they told us. Things were dry here early in the growing season and corn and soybeans. This caused corn ear pops to be very low and even though these ears were impressive, there just weren’t enough of them here. Our yield for this corn was 92 bushels to the acre. Soybeans were pretty decent and the plants had many pods on a bushy stalk. I did notice quite a few 2-bean pods which would also be due to lack of rain during a critical part of the growing stage. Our pod count was 1382 in a 3 foot square.Iroquois County, IllinoisIroquois County, IllinoisIroquois County, IllinoisIroquois County, Illinois10:25 a.m.This will be our last county in Indiana and we will do two stops here in Warren County. A ton of rain has fallen here as we are seeing standing water everywhere. Hearing up to 5 inches in the last 24 hours in this area. This field gave us a run for our money with 15 inch rows which, on a rainy day with muddy shoes is a whole lot of fun. Ear count was solid for narrow rows and this field was close to denting. This will be the highest yield I have seen on tour at 226 bushels per acre. Soybeans were better here than we have seen all day. Podded early and often here and the rain we are seeing today will only benefit. Our 3 x 3 square foot pod count was 1236.Warren County, IndianaWarren County, Indiana9:21 a.m.Once again, we are seeing decent ear counts in corn fields in this part of Indiana. We are in Tippecanoe County currently. The lengths of the ears and tip back are not helping get yield numbers to where farmers here are used to. Our guess here is at 151. The beans were very young and planted into wheat stubble. This will bring the pod count down dramatically, but there is still lots of potential in this field and this rain is certainly helping here. Our pod count was 343 in a 3 x 3 square.Tippecanoe County, IndianaTippecanoe County, IndianaTippecanoe County, IndianaTippecanoe County, Indiana8:52 a.m.Still in Clinton County, Indiana and stalk quality was a major issue here. Some downed trees in the area is telling us that some wind has come through here recently and this corn field could not handle it. If another strong system gets here more stalks will topple as a result. Our yield calc here is 133. The soybeans were very wavy here, but the pod count was the highest we have seen so far on Day 2. Rain is falling here and the soils were very wet. That gave us a better look at the root system. Our 3 by 3 foot area pod count was 998.Clinton County, IndianaClinton County, IndianaClinton County, Indiana8:05 a.m.This corn is farther along and starting to dent here in Clinton County, Indiana. These ears were heavier than I have seen so far on tour and every ear was 16 around and our yield was at 210 bushel to the acre. Soybeans had a few skips in the area of the field we ended up in and pod count was just okay per plant we sampled. Our pod count in a 3 x 3 square was 768.Clinton County, IndianaClinton County, Indiana7:30 a.mTook a while to get out of town and find some fields in this highly developed part of Hamilton County, Indiana. This corn still have some time to get to dent, but the uniformity here was noticeable compared to yesterday and skips were rare here. Ear length hurt here with one at 4 1/2 inches long. Our yield guess is 155. Soybeans were healthy with very little disease or insect pressure. Dirt here was dry and although we have rain on the radar all around us, we are not wet yet. Our pod count in a 3 by 3 foot square was 929.Hamilton County, IndianaHamilton County, IndianaHamilton County, IndianaHamilton County, Indianalast_img read more

Bail for alleged Maoist sympathiser in Yerwada jail since 2015

first_imgThe Bombay High Court on Monday granted bail to Konnath Muralidharan, 66, an alleged sympathiser of Communist Party of India (Maoist), who has been in Yerwada jail since May 2015 after the Maharashtra Anti-Terrorism Squad (ATS) arrested him for possessing ‘objectionable material’. His bail has been previously rejected by the Pune court in September 2016.On May 8, 2015, Mr. Muralidharan was arrested at 6 a.m. after the ATS got information that he, along with an aide Chirag Palli, were operating from their hideout at Talegaon in Pune. ATS recovered hand written notes along with printed literature that talked about Operation Green Hunt, central military commission and other material related to CPI (Maoists).According to the FIR, Mr. Muralidharan introduced himself as Thomas Joseph and was holding names such as Sunny alias Rajendra Goppi Vijayan alias Raghavan alias Ajith Kannampillai alias Kannakaran. His aide Mr. Palli introduced himself as James Mathew.Statements of some witnesses were recorded and the ATS had seized laptops, CPUs, printers, three pen drives, 10 mobile handsets, five sim cards, two dongles and books in Malayalam from them.The ATS also recovered a fake PAN card in the name of Thomas Joseph with Mr. Muralidharan’s photo, while Mr. Palli had a fake Aadhaar card in his name.Mr. Muralidharan was charged with Section 419 (punishment for cheating by personation), Section 467 (forgery of valuable security, will, etc), Section 468 (forgery for purpose of cheating), Section 471(using as genuine a forged document or electronic record) of the Indian Penal Code and Section 10 (penalty for being member of an unlawful association, etc), Section 13 (punishment for unlawful activities), Section 20 (punishment for being member of terrorist gang or organisation), Section 38 (offence relating to membership of a terrorist organisation), and Section 39 (offence relating to support given to a terrorist organisation) of the Unlawful Activities Prevention Act (UAPA).The ATS filed a chargesheet on October 14, 2015, before a sessions court in Pune. On September 9, 2016, Mr. Muralidharan who suffered heart ailments prior to his arrest, and suffered a mild heart attack while he was lodged in prison, moved a bail application which was rejected by the Pune court. The present bail application, filed in HC through his advocates Sudeep Pasbola and Susan Abraham, states that he has been falsely implicated, and that there is no evidence to prosecute him under UAPA.Justice Nitin Sambre granted bail to Mr. Murlidharan on ₹1 lakh surety and ordered him to report to Pune police station twice a month.last_img read more