Top 10 Air Leaks in Existing Homes — Part 1

first_imgWhenever we’re working on the outside of a home—the roofing, siding, or site—my uncle Chris will remind me to think like a drop of water. Mentally tracing how a raindrop is likely to travel down a building, and including details to move it off and away, is a simple exercise that is too often ignored.Today, though, we’re going to talk not about water but about air. I have a new exercise to propose to Chris: think like a wisp of air.Air leaks through the building envelope—the walls, foundation, and roofs—can have a significant effect on durability, even when compared with water leaks. Not only can air leaks carry moisture into framing cavities, leading to condensation that causes mold and rot, but it is typically responsible for a large portion of a home’s energy use and indoor air quality problems. Where are the leaks?When building new, paying close attention to a tight and continuous air barrier should be a top priority. There are well-established (and oft-neglected) best practices for “building tight,” but finding leaks in existing buildings is a different problem. Your caulk and spray foam can are ready to go—where to look for leaks?You have to think like the air, and air molecules are like mice: it is unbelievable what they can fit through. Here, in no particular order, are my ten most likely suspects for air leaks on existing homes. One key concept is that air leakage pathways are often interconnected—and so are some of these ten.1) The chimney chase. From the basement all the way up through the roof, the chimney chase is a perfect venue for the “stack effect,” in which warm, buoyant air floats up and out of the house, with cold outside air being pulled in at the bottom to replace it.An unfilled gap between a brick chimney and the wood framing is common in old houses, creating a jet engine of air leakage. Seal it wherever you can access it—in the basement and attic, at least—using fire-safe materials. Many old homes have unused chimneys. Check that the cleanout door and any other chimney openings are properly sealed.2) Light fixtures and plumbing. Plumbing is often routed in “chases” running from the basement up through the first and second stories. Although not usually running through the attic like the chimney does, this again represents a great opportunity for stack effect air leakage, which air will never fail to capitalize on.When the air movement reaches the second story and is looking for a path through to the attic and beyond, it turns to light fixtures, wiring penetrations, smoke detectors, and bath fans, all of which are often cut through the attic floor. It may look like that globe light is firmly attached to the ceiling, but air can easily find some cracks through. To make matters worse, these holes are often buried under attic insulation, making them harder to fix. Applying spray foam from the attic side, and only then piling on insulation, is the best solution.3) Interior wall cavities. That’s right: interior walls may be among your home’s worst culprits for air leakage. An energy audit including a blower door test, can prove the point, but if you’re still putting that off, find a place in your home where there is some cracked or missing plaster or an old wall register that’s not hooked up anymore. On a cold, windy day, put the back of your hand or a lit match up against the crack and feel the  cold breeze.Because of how houses are framed, particularly balloon-frame houses (built up until the mid-1950s), interior walls communicate with the floor structure, which communicates with the exterior wall, often at a location with no insulation or air seal. Plaster repair, spray foam, or caulk can be appropriate fixes depending on the setting.4) Windows and doors. Remember, we ask a lot from windows and doors. We put these holes in the building to let in light and air—but then we put up blinds to keep the light out and we get upset when the windows are drafty in the winter.New, good quality windows should not be leaky, but most existing homes don’t have new, good quality windows. Older windows can be reconditioned, and doing so is usually cost-effective. Through an energy audit I found significant leaks at the bottom of my double-hung windows, and at the point in the middle where the sashes meet. I installed new weatherstripping, which cut off the leakage almost completely.We hope that the door started out airtight, but with all the opening and closing, putting stress in the middle of the door, they easily get warped out of shape a bit, pulling away from the weatherstripping—and the weatherstripping gets old. New weatherstripping can often fix the problem, but if the door is really bent out of shape, it may not be enough.5) Basement masonry and sills. The above-grade portion of basement walls, and the junction between the foundation and the wooden sill are typically big air leakage holes. (As a rule, any junction between systems or materials is a weak point.) A foam “sill seal” is typically used here in new construction, but in existing homes the wooden framing is commonly sitting on a brick or block foundation, and the slight crack between the two, multiplied by the building perimeter, is enough to leak a lot of air.Add to that the masonry itself: cracks in the stone, brick, or block will leak. Also, concrete blocks may look solid, but all those little pores can let a lot of wind through. Use of either spray-applied foam, rigid foam, or a combination, is a common way to defeat these problems.I’ll cover the second half of my top ten leakage points in my next post. In the meantime, post your favorite air leakage points below.For more on keeping it tight, see Questions and Answers About Air Barriers.Tristan Roberts is Editorial Director at BuildingGreen, Inc., in Brattleboro, Vermont, which publishes information on green building solutions.last_img read more

Three arrested for bid to kill Uttar Pradesh BJP MLA

first_imgThe Uttar Pradesh Police’s Special Task Force (STF) on Friday arrested a notorious sharpshooter, who was allegedly planning to kill BJP MLA Sushil Singh, after a brief encounter in Varanasi, an official statement said. Shiv Prakash Tiwari alias Dhoni Tiwari was carrying a cash reward of ₹1 lakh on his head, it said. Following a tip off, Tiwari and two of his associates — Manish Kesarwani and Ajnana Singh — were arrested from Varanasi’s Cantt police station area, the STF statement said. During interrogation, Tiwari revealed he had come to Varanasi with his associates to kill Singh, the BJP MLA from Saiyadraja assembly constituency. His associates were doing a recce for it, the statement said. Tiwari was convicted in the sensational murder of Hindu Yuva Vahini leader Bishnu Dutt Ojha in 2011 in Basti district but was absconding, it said.last_img read more

a month agoMan Utd manager Solskjaer fears the worst for Rashford injury

first_imgMan Utd manager Solskjaer fears the worst for Rashford injuryby Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveOle Gunnar Solskjaer is worried Marcus Rashford could be sidelined after injuring his groin in Sunday’s 2-0 loss to West Ham United.The England international was substituted after 60 minutes when he suffered a muscle injury.”We have got to scan him tomorrow,” Solskjaer said after the match.”He felt his groin. So he will probably be out for a little while. I can update you later when I know a little more.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Still investigating RCMP say too early to know what happened in Broncos

first_imgREGINA – Police say it’s too early to say what happened in a fatal bus crash involving the Humboldt Broncos junior hockey team and whether charges will be laid.Complex collision reconstruction investigations take time and are often measured in weeks and months rather than days.  But be assured, we are committed to providing updates as the investigation progresses.— RCMP Saskatchewan (@RCMPSK) April 19, 2018“All of our efforts are dedicated to determining why the tractor-trailer unit was in the intersection,” Zablocki said Thursday.“We know the road conditions were clear and the sun was shining at the time of the collision.”Sixteen people — including 10 players — were killed and another 13 people were injured. The driver of the semi-trailer was not hurt. He was taken into custody immediately after the collision and released later that evening.“The tractor-trailer unit driver remains in regular contact with our officers,” said Zablocki. He said the driver’s level of experience, the size of his load and where he was headed will be part of the investigation.Sukhmander Singh, the owner of the Calgary-based trucking company, said the truck driver is doing better.“He’s feeling good now and going to the doctor,” said Singh, who added the driver is still in counselling.Singh said he’s basically out of business after Alberta Transportation ordered Adesh Deol Trucking Ltd. to keep its only other truck off the road. The move is standard when a company has been involved in a serious accident, the province has said.“I’m just waiting for the investigation,” said Singh.Zablocki said there are still many unanswered questions and an investigation of such magnitude is measured in weeks or months, not days.He said experts are looking into three areas: environmental factors such as road conditions and visibility, the mechanics of both vehicles and the role of the drivers.The intersection north of Saskatoon was closed Thursday because a forensic collision reconstruction team was doing more tests and analysis.Zablocki said it’s not unusual to revisit a collision scene.“Our folks have gone back … to reposition similar or like vehicles in the area, in the intersection, and further examine potential site lines and other analytical aspects.”— With files from Bill Graveland in Calgarylast_img read more

Deaths of three Indigenous women in Montreal ignite calls for more frontline

first_imgTom FennarioAPTN NewsDavid Chapman stands near the kitchen inside the Open Door shelter in Montreal and points to a framed picture on the wall.“It just struck me that she was really bright and had a, seemed like a full life ahead of her,” says Chapman, executive director of the shelter.The photo he’s pointing to is of Crystal Einish, a Cree woman in her 20s from Eeyou Istchee – Cree Territory in Quebec.She died after drinking too much alcohol.“She was talking to me about her son, she loved her son, and to be honest I was just completely shocked when I heard only two days later she was no longer with us,” says Chapman.(The photo of Crystal Einish that hangs on the wall inside the Open Door shelter in Montreal)Einish isn’t the only photo on the wall.Walk into Montreal’s Open Door shelter and you’ll find thirteen framed photos.Dubbed the “memorial wall,” the photos are of former clients who have died – eight of the thirteen are Indigenous women, all within the last two years.Before the photos had been located in a less formal space, near a bulletin board.But after a deadly January, where three Indigenous women who frequented the Open Door died, the need for a larger wall became evident.“If things don’t change we’re gonna need more space still,” says Chapman.Chapman says he knew the women well and that substance abuse also played a role in the recent deaths of the two other women.But when they were alive and wanted help, it wasn’t available.He points to yet another photo, Inuk woman Connie Kadlutsiak.“Connie asked three times to go to detox and rehab, and a number of efforts were made but each time there was a waiting list,” he says.“And you often have a very short window of time where there is a desire to go forward with detox and rehab and if you miss that window then you’re back to square one.”(Open Door Executive Director David Chapman. In the background is the wall of photos of clients who have died)Harvey Michele is the interim president of the Indigenous Health Centre of Tiohtià:ke.Tiohtià:ke is the Mohawk word for Montreal, and Michele says the city is lacking compared to Canada’s other major cities.Toronto, Ottawa, Vancouver all have centres devoted to Indigenous health.“We’re, let’s say, 20 years behind from other provinces, where they are more specifically targeting Indigenous health,” says Michele, an Ojibway who has lived in Montreal for over 40 years.“For the underserviced Indigenous community, the need is great.”Incorporated in 2016, the Tiohtià:ke Health Centre is still in its infancy.The goal is to eventually establish a location where Indigenous people can get health services catered to their needs.“The Indigenous Health Centre of Tiohtià:ke would work with the community member in dealing with the root cause of their addiction. Sadly, many First Nations and Inuit continue to fall in the cracks,” says Michele.“The rate of mortality is very high for this population due to the lack of access to addiction and mental health services that are culturally not safe for the vulnerable population.”Michele says that the health centre is a part of a larger conglomeration of Montreal Indigenous organizations called the Health Services Partnership Table for Urban Indigenous Persons.Together they are gearing up to push for health services funding, but Michele admits establishing a fully functioning Indigenous health centre in Montreal will take years.In the meantime, she would like to see more funds for health navigators, people who are paid specifically to help vulnerable folks navigate the health system.The health centre currently has two on staff.For David Chapman, more funding and programs can’t come soon enough with regards to keeping more photos from going up on the Open Door memorial wall.“In this case there is very much a direct link between funding recovery and span of life.”tfennario@aptn.ca@tfennariolast_img read more

Skeptical Football Matthew Stafford Is Gunning For Peyton Mannings Throne

On Sunday night, I put out a call on Twitter for burning NFL questions. Among the responses, some guy asked:Whoa, boss. This is a question for which everyone seems to have an answer, but about which few people have anything new to say.Assessing how good someone is at something is easy if that thing is directly measurable, like running 100 meters, or is independent enough to be measured over time, like hitting a baseball. In sports like basketball or hockey, contributions may be harder to measure, but can often be imputed indirectly: There’s often enough data to see how a team performs with or without individual players.1At the very least we can model how various statistical markers (like points, rebounds or assists) predict how a team performs with or without individual players. All of these metrics are basically variations of “statistical plus-minus” — even ones that came before, like John Hollinger’s PER.But in football, a player’s contribution is impossible to measure directly, because there are too many variables that go into every result. And it can’t be measured indirectly, because the sample sizes are too small (that is, there are relatively few games and not as much data). Thus, player valuation is a quagmire of guesswork and debate.This is why I prefer questions of limited scope, like, “How certain are you that Peyton Manning is a good quarterback?” For which, the answer is “really extra pretty super-duper certain.” OK, that seems obvious, but ask me the same question about Joe Montana — whom many regard as the greatest quarterback of all time — and I’m not sure. It seems very, very likely to me that Montana was a good quarterback, but I am literally thousands of times less certain of that fact than I am when evaluating Manning.But that doesn’t even prove that Manning was better than Montana, though I tend to think the odds are tilted a bit in his favor. The problem with saying anyone is “the best” is that he has to be better than Montana, then better than Dan Marino, then better than Lawrence Taylor, etc. And it’s even possible that the true winner could be someone with incredible skills who was never in the right situation. Like, what if Jeff George had played for Bill Walsh? Anything is possible.So we can’t know for sure. But we constantly have to act on things we don’t know for sure. Thus, if my life depended on guessing who was the best NFL player of all time, I’d pick Peyton Manning.2But, oops, the answer was Randall Cunningham, and now I’m dead. Not because he’s clearly the best, but because he seems to have the best odds of being the best.Why do I think that? Have you got all day? OK then, short version, there are four main axes to the issue:3Any one of which could probably be a series of posts in its own right. Answering this isn’t quite as straightforward as it sounds.For the largest gap between a player’s TD per game and the baseline for his era, the answer is Peyton Manning. Not only is he the all-time pass touchdown per game leader, but he’s about .7 touchdowns per game higher than the league average for his era. But as a ratio between a passer’s TD per game and that of the entire league during the period he played, he is only in second place. For the highest, you have to go all the way back into the 20s, when Benjamin “Benny” Friedman of the New York Giants got it done:Manning has 1.51 times more TD passes per game than his era, but Friedman had 1.65 times more.If you look at the details, that 1.65 might not even do it justice. In 1929, Friedman had 20 TD passes. The next highest total that season: six. The entire league (12 teams) had only 81 TD passes; Friedman accounted for nearly one quarter of them. And he was way ahead of his time — the NFL wouldn’t even reach .6 touchdown passes per game until after Friedman retired.Also worth consideration is Dan Marino. While technically his TD rate may not have been as far above average as Manning’s, he played in an era when no one else was even close.8He also did it in an era that didn’t feature any massive changes to the game, unlike Friedman’s era and possibly the present one. Note that Manning has a lot of company in the two TD/game zone, including Aaron Rodgers right beneath him.I had to do a double take at first because there are so many modern players on that list, despite the fact that the measurement is relative to era. In other words, the current era isn’t just an era of pass-happy offenses, it’s an era in which some offenses are way more pass-happy than others.Rookie QB watchThis week we saw the Jacksonville Jaguars’ Blake Bortles score his first win (despite throwing three interceptions, he was the first rookie to win a game since last month), and Teddy Bridgewater score his first touchdown pass for the Minnesota Vikings. With the Cleveland Browns’ Manziel still on the bench, the rookie QB game seems to be all about Bortles, Bridgewater and the Raiders’ Derek Carr. Each of these now has at least four full games under their belt — that’s a big achievement unlocked. So let’s start comparing some real stats.What we learn about rookies is very different from what we learn from other QBs. Normally we care a lot about efficiency and how much a QB helps his team win, but for rookies we’re normally looking for raw production. But let’s take a peek at efficiency anyway, shall we?Here’s a table comparing the rate at which each QB’s drives end in a touchdown or interception, and the average Expected Points Added (EPA) per drive:Carr currently leads all three categories. Note that their EPAs are all negative, meaning they are scoring fewer points per drive than a typical NFL team — but Carr is doing the least-worst.Kicking awardsIt was kind of a crazy week for kicking, with the entire NFL making just three of eight tries from 50+ yards, but going 45 for 46 on all other attempts. (That’s why you see a large cluster of kickers just to the right of zero in the chart).Last week I talked about the golden triad of young kickers, which includes Blair Walsh, Justin Tucker and Dan Bailey. All three made all of their kicks in Week 7, and Walsh took the MVK award, largely due to his 55-yard make just before the half. It’s like the Hacker Gods were paying attention and wanted to justify my devoting a large section of this column every week to kickers.9Though, admittedly, my perception that one event resulted directly from the other could just be a fiction. From the Hacker Gods’ perspective, they may have simply programmed me and the universe to recognize Walsh at the same time.Cairo Santos also deserves recognition for hitting a 48-yard game-winning field goal, but the points vs. expectation model isn’t impressed by a 48-yard attempt.10As of this moment, the MVP algorithm doesn’t distinguish between close games that you won and close games that you lost.This week Walsh was one of two kickers (along with Shayne Graham of the New Orleans Saints) who had points above expectation higher than the margin of victory or defeat in their games. Unfortunately, both of their teams lost their games, so no kicker earns a “win” just yet. (My definition of a kicker “win” is that their points above expectation must have been the difference in the game –not just their actual points scored. Kicker “wins” are extremely rare. There have been none so far in 2014, and there were seven in 2013, with Justin Tucker taking two of them. In 2012 there were none.)Gunslinger of the weekMatthew Stafford led his team back from a 14-point third-quarter deficit — still down 13 points with under 4 minutes to go — to win against the New Orleans Saints. Oh, and he threw an interception in the fourth quarter with his team still down 10.Stafford, for all his woes as QB of the Lions, seems to have a game well suited to the gunslinger paradigm.Among QBs with 20 or more games with comeback opportunities (down 9+ in the second half), Stafford now has the third-highest winning percentage, behind only Tom Brady and Peyton Manning. This is, of course, despite his relatively high interception rate (e.g., over twice as high as Aaron Rodgers’s):That he did this for lowly Detroit is particularly remarkable to me, since Stafford has gotten some of the worst team support in football.There’s a basic way to test how much support a QB gets. Winning Percentage Added (WPA) is a stat that measures how a team’s chances of winning a game (based on league-wide models for a typical team) change after each play. Thus, a QB’s WPA for a game is how much his team’s chances of winning increased on the plays he was involved with. All else being equal, his team should win a game about 50 percent of the time plus the QB’s WPA.11If you’re clever you can adjust this for home/away, etc.If you take this estimate and then subtract from the actual result, you get a figure equal to the amount of winning percentage added by elements of the team that are NOT the passing game (including running, defense, and special teams). We can plot a comparison between these two like so:Some QBs like Tom Brady and Joe Flacco actually win more often than their passing would suggest, meaning the non-passing part of their team is contributing as well. Others have to overcome bad teams. Stafford is a great example of this, as he typically adds close to 10 percent to his teams chances, only to see even more stripped in the plays where he isn’t an active participant. In fact, Stafford gets the worst support of any QB with a positive WPA.Most empirically significant game of Week 8Lots of great and/or interesting QB matchups in Week 8, such as:Philip Rivers vs. Peyton ManningMatthew Stafford vs. Matt RyanJay Cutler vs. Tom BradyAndrew Luck vs. Ben RoethlisbergerAaron Rodgers vs. Drew BreesJoe Flacco vs. Andy DaltonRussell Wilson vs. Cam NewtonOoh, the final matchup is an interesting one. Two 25-year-old former rookie Pro Bowlers known for their running abilities — one 5 feet 11 inches and the other 6 feet 6 inches.Last week, Wilson joined the illustrious list of QBs who passed for 300 yards and ran for 100 in the same game:Yet the Seahawks picked up their third loss, equaling Wilson’s total from last season. As the boss notes, the Seahawks are in a precarious spot, such that, even aside from the information value of a loss, it may get very hard for the Hawks to make the playoffs even if they’re really good, considering their schedule and division. Are the Seahawks going to be a dynasty like the Pats or teams-Peyton-Manning-is-QBing? Or will they regress to the mean and/or burn out like most teams do?Both teams are 3-3 (though Carolina also has a tie). Historically, teams that start 4-3 make the playoffs about 30 percentage points more often than teams that start 3-4 (about 50 percent vs. about 20 percent). So it’s a high-leverage game on both sides.Reminder: If you tweet questions to me @skepticalsports, there is a non-zero chance that I’ll answer them here.Charts by Reuben Fischer-Baum. A player’s location on the y-axis represents the number of TDs he has thrown per game played for his entire career. The horizontal lines show the span of his career. The bubble at the end of each career shows you how many touchdown passes he threw in total. The thick black line shows you the NFL’s average TD’s thrown per game by year. What do we take away from this?First, NFL teams have gotten better at passing for touchdowns, though I was a little surprised at how many touchdowns were thrown in the 50s and 60s. Johnny Unitas, for example, wasn’t nearly the outlier I assumed he would be: While he did break what was then a long-standing record (ultimately by a very large amount), he was also a product of a very passing-friendly era.Manning now has the largest bubble, obviously, and in a shorter career than Brett Favre’s — so far. But the record-setting QBs are a pretty elite group.So, relatedly, here’s another question I got on Twitter: Stats: No matter how you slice and dice the stats — career stats, drive stats, winning stats, efficiency stats, or whatever you want — Manning generally comes out on top. But players in the NFL aren’t responsible for their stats to nearly the degree players are in baseball or basketball, so without more corroborating evidence, this doesn’t mean as much as people think.But perhaps even more important than the stats themselves is consistency: Manning’s consistency is preternatural. Since 2001, he has completed 65 percent or more of his passes every year and only once passed for fewer than 4,000 yards.4He had 3,747 in 2005. Most quarterbacks’ performance varies significantly from year to year, largely as a result of the changing variables around them. But Manning essentially does the same thing year in and year out.Lack of entanglement: Manning has played for four different coaches and two different teams now, and hasn’t failed to win 10 games since 2001.5Also, the Colts stunk the one year they were without him or Andrew Luck, though I’d discount this a bit because it isn’t clear that they were trying very hard to win. Of course, it’s still possible that he has been surrounded by superior talent, but that’s a lot of lucky to get. Looking at dynasties in NFL history, who has ever been so good for so long? The 49ers, who had three different coaches and two great QBs; the Patriots, with one quarterback and one great coach; and Peyton Manning. Winning consistently in the NFL is hard, especially in the salary cap era.But the playoffs: Manning gets knocked for performing below expectations in the playoffs, and I won’t dismiss the issue out of hand. As I’ve shown before, Manning handles tough defenses well.6In some preliminary research, I’ve also found that Manning performs slightly better in the playoffs against teams that he also played in the regular season. So there are basically three possibilities: first, Manning has gotten unlucky in the playoffs; second, Manning has gotten lucky in the regular season; or third, Manning just plays worse in the playoffs for some reason. I can’t disprove the third possibility, and I’m not above believing that sort of thing, but I haven’t seen a plausible explanation yet.The second and third axes are probably undervalued. Manning’s unnatural consistency in a number of different scenarios is a unique phenomenon. And this is what Bayesian inference is all about: I’ve just witnessed a phenomenon, and I want to know what the most likely causes are. To do this, I consider the likelihood of each potential cause, and the likelihood of those causes creating that effect.And so in this case the question is really, which is more likely: that Manning has been uniquely, historically, fortunate in having many great players and coaches around him constantly, or that Manning is a unique, historical talent?Chart of the weekOne area where Manning seems unassailable is in the record books, but in fairness to everyone else, he has presided over a distinctly offensive era. So how does his career touchdown record stack up to history?Let’s summarize every NFL QB’s career in one chart:7Like The New York Times did, but different. read more

The Slobs looking for their newest member in 2015

Then-redshirt-sophomore quarterback Cardale Jones (12) lines up behind members of the offensive line during the College Football National Championship game against Oregon on Jan. 12 in Arlington, Texas. OSU won, 42-20.Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorMuch like the rest of the Ohio State football team, the offensive line is bringing back plenty of experience.With four starters coming back to Columbus and just one spot open, it appears as though there’s a two-horse race to become a starting member of what the Buckeyes call “the slobs.”Redshirt-senior Chase Farris and sophomore Jamarco Jones are the frontrunners to replace Darryl Baldwin at right tackle, but offensive line coach and offensive coordinator Ed Warinner said Farris is ahead of the pack.“He hit stride where we thought he was playing really good towards the end of the (2014) season, but you got a starting lineup, we (were) on a roll. Darryl Baldwin was playing his butt off,” Warinner said Thursday. “If he keeps doing what he’s doing, he’ll be able to take that position over, (but) Jamarco Jones is not by any means just going to let him have it.”While Jones is behind Farris on the depth chart for now, he has been getting extensive reps in practice at left tackle with senior Taylor Decker sitting out most of spring practice for rest purposes.Decker said Thursday that he also believes Farris is the favorite to win the job, but has been pleasantly surprised with the way Jones has been performing in his usual spot.“I think he is doing a really good job. The one thing I wanted to see personally out of him was consistency and how he practices. I think he is developing that, especially with all of the reps he is getting, he doesn’t have a choice,” Decker said. “Coach (Urban) Meyer is going to be right there watching him. Coach Warinner is going to be watching him because they expect a lot out of him.”Regardless of who wins the job, Warinner said he is pleased with the personnel he has along the offensive front. “I love the chemistry with those guys. They are great people, I love being around them. They are part of a family that we are all a part of,” Warinner said. “Those guys are great, great kids and that’s why we have a great room and so forth.”Redshirt-junior offensive lineman Pat Elflein, who is set to enter into his second full season as a starter, said the chemistry within the unit is a credit to Warinner’s “very intense” coaching.“He’s a perfectionist. He won’t let anything slip. No matter what it is, wrong step, whatever, hand placement, if it’s not perfect, he’s on you,” Elflein said Thursday. “I think that is probably his best quality and that’s why we’ve been playing so good. He has developed so many guys to be great players.”But while he is a coach and not a player, how does Warinner fit in among the self-named “slobs?”“I don’t know where that name came from. I didn’t give them that, but I am the head of them. So I am an honorary. I am also trying to lose 10 pounds,” Warinner said with a smile. “They are always trying to gain their weight. They’re human garbage disposals. Eight-thousand calories a day and they look pretty good doing it. If I keep up with them, you’ll have to get a 4X (shirt) for me.”With a coach who has developed players and has just one starting spot to fill, Elflein said he is excited to see where the Buckeyes’ front five can go.“We just have to get everybody on the same page. It’s not easy. That’s our goal is to get everybody bought into the culture and if we can do that, watch out,” Elflein said. “We are going to have a good unit.”The Buckeyes are set to take to the field for their annual Spring Game on April 18 at Ohio Stadium before beginning the 2015 season on the road against Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., on Sept. 7. read more

Kapil Sharmas wife Ginni Chatrath blooms with pregnancy glow at friends baby

first_imgKapil Sharma, Ginni Chatrath attend a friend’s baby shower along with The Kapil Sharma Show crew membersInstagramKapil Sharma will soon embrace parenthood with his wife Ginni Chatrath who is currently in her second trimester of pregnancy. The soon-to-be parents recently came back to India after spending a quality time on their babymoon in Canada. And while there’s no limit to Kapil’s happiness, Ginni is currently blooming with her pregnancy glow. The couple recently attended a friend’s baby shower wherein Ginni was seen flaunting her baby bump flashing a million dollar on her face while posing for a group picture. She was accompanied by Kapil and the crew of The Kapil Sharma Show including Kiku Sharda, Krushna Abhishek, Sumona Chakravarty, Rochelle Rao and others. Ever since Kapil Sharma learned about Ginni’s pregnancy, he had made a lot of changes to his busy shoot schedule to be with his long-time girlfriend and now wife. During the initial days of pregnancy, Kapil used to quickly wind up his work and would rush to home to take care of Ginni. Krushna Abhishek and wife Kashmera Shah, on their twins’ Rayaan and Krishaang’s second birthday bash on June 2, had said that they are very happy and excited for Kapil’s baby to arrive. Kapil and Ginni’s first baby is reportedly due in December.last_img read more

Trump calls Sadiq Khan a disaster

first_imgMayor of London Sadiq Khan speaks during an interview with Reuters at an event to promote the start of London Tech Week, in London, Britain, 10 June 2019. Photo: ReutersUS president Donald Trump once again criticised London mayor Sadiq Khan on Saturday, saying he is a “disaster” and will “only get worse” after three people were slain in the city in less than 20 hours.Trump retweeted a tweet by the right-wing commentator Katie Hopkins who called London “stab city” and said “this is Khan’s Londonistan,” a phrase used to describe the city’s failure to tackle Muslim extremists.”LONDON needs a new mayor ASAP. Khan is a disaster – will only get worse!” Trump said on Twitter.Trump called Khan, a Muslim of Pakistani heritage, a “stone-cold loser” earlier this month after the mayor criticised the British government for inviting Trump for a state visit and compared him to 20th century fascists.Trump’s feud with Khan dates back several years. Khan has criticised Trump’s effort to ban travellers from Muslim countries, while the president has castigated the mayor for his handling of a 2017 terrorist attack on the London bridge that killed 11 people.last_img read more