Brick used to smash van outside owner’s home in Letterkenny

first_imgAn investigation is underway after a van was badly damaged while parked outside the owner’s home in Letterkenny.The incident happened during the night of Tuesday the 18th of June at The Glebe, Ramelton Road.A brick was thrown at the van, which resulted in the windscreen being smashed.  Gardaí are appealing for information in relation to the criminal damage incident. If anyone has any information or was in the area between the 18th of June at 11.50 pm and the 19th of June at 00.30 am. then contact Gardaí on 074-9167100 or on 1800 666 111.Brick used to smash van outside owner’s home in Letterkenny was last modified: June 27th, 2019 by Caitlin LairdShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Jeff Duling, May11

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest On Thursday, April 30 we started planting corn and we didn’t stop until yesterday. We no-till everything. The first corn we planted was 300 acres of custom work and that gave our no-till fields a little longer to dry.I was glad to get some rain. I was hoping to get a half-inch or so to get the chemicals working. On Saturday and Sunday we had anything from .45  up to 1.7 inches in the Delphos area. In Hancock County there were areas that didn’t get any rain. We took yesterday off because of the Mother’s Day curse. We didn’t do anything yesterday and I was glad we stopped because it got wet pretty fast. They are talking about some heavy rain today.The majority of corn we planted that first week is up. There are some beans up. We started sewing beans on that Friday or Saturday and those are up. I am just about done planting. I only have 16 aces of corn to go and 200 acres of beans. That 16 acres has not been fit yet. It is wetter ground, so we may not be doing that this week yet because it looks like we are getting rain and cooler temperatures.Boy that 85-degree weather really helped move things along. Everything got in the ground with warmer temperatures and I feel comfortable with how everything went in. I am really pleased with the stands we have out there so far. The wheat is really coming on and it looks better now that you can’t see the holes from the road. We had a heck of a run there.last_img read more

LSGH completes improbable climb, upsets Mapua for first crown

first_imgIt was the first title for LSGH since joining the league in 1998.Coach Marvin Bienvenida dedicated the victory to the long list of players and coaches who were involved in the program from the start.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“We joined the NCAA in 1998 and for all the players who played since 1998 until today, this is for them,” Bienvenida said, after his wards unseated the Cardinals.Cagulangan, the 5-foot-9 playmaker, once again made the biggest impact by nailing two free throws with under a minute left to put the Junior Blazers ahead to stay. LATEST STORIES Kris Aquino ‘pretty chill about becoming irrelevant’ Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA The performance capped an impressive three weeks for Cagulangan, who almost singlehandedly carried LSGH to wins against San Beda in the semifinals and against Mapua in the finals opener.The Junior Blazers dropped five of their last six games in the elimination round, before bundling out San Sebastian College-Recoletos in a playoff for the No. 4 seed. Joshua David and Joel Cagulangan sparkled down the stretch as College of St. Benilde-La Salle Green Hills stunned top seed and defending champion Mapua, 75-74, to capture its first NCAA juniors basketball crown on Friday at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.David finished with 27 points, while Cagulangan dished out an all-around game of 19 points, nine rebounds and seven assists as the Junior Blazers completed a stunning climb to the top, after nearly missing out on the playoffs.ADVERTISEMENT Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justicecenter_img Reyes lauds Gilas composure vs ‘skilled, talented’ Japanese Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC View comments MOST READ QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Read Nextlast_img read more

Video: FSU RB’s Working Out With Wet Footballs To Prepare For Potential Downpour Saturday

first_imgFSU players and coaches at practice.FSU FootballsFlorida State travels to Wake Forest this Saturday, and the game could be affected by the path of Hurricane Joaquin. At the very least, heavy rain could fall during the contest, and the Seminoles are preparing for the inclement conditions. Here’s a video courtesy of FSU beat writer Safid Deen showing the Seminole running backs working with wet footballs in anticipation of a downpour on Saturday. The balls get a quick dunk in a bucket of water before being used in the drill.FSU’s running backs working with wet footballs in preparation for Saturday’s game at Wake Forest. #Noles pic.twitter.com/tvkRuRavtE— Safid Deen (@Safid_Deen) October 1, 2015Can’t leave any stone unturned when getting ready to play.last_img read more

SBI cuts lending rates by marginal 5 bps

first_imgMumbai: The nation’s largest lender State Bank of India Tuesday reduced the lending rates by a marginal 5 basis points across all tenors, effective April 10. The revised one-year marginal cost of funds-based lending rate (MCLR) stands at 8.50 percent down from 8.55 percent earlier, the bank said in a statement. The lender has also cut interest rates on housing loans up to Rs 30 lakh by 10 bps. Accordingly, the interest rate on housing loans below Rs 30 lakh will be in the range of 8.60-8.90 percent, from 8.70-9 percent earlier. The move follows a 25 basis points cut in repo rate by the Reserve Bank in its first monetary policy review announced last week. In the February policy review also the monetary authority had lowered the key rates by a similar quantum. In a 4:2 majority vote, the central bank had cut the repo rate to 6 percent from 6.25 percent earleir, citing the need to support growth that has been sluggish since many months.last_img read more

Skeptical Football Matthew Stafford Is Gunning For Peyton Mannings Throne

On Sunday night, I put out a call on Twitter for burning NFL questions. Among the responses, some guy asked:Whoa, boss. This is a question for which everyone seems to have an answer, but about which few people have anything new to say.Assessing how good someone is at something is easy if that thing is directly measurable, like running 100 meters, or is independent enough to be measured over time, like hitting a baseball. In sports like basketball or hockey, contributions may be harder to measure, but can often be imputed indirectly: There’s often enough data to see how a team performs with or without individual players.1At the very least we can model how various statistical markers (like points, rebounds or assists) predict how a team performs with or without individual players. All of these metrics are basically variations of “statistical plus-minus” — even ones that came before, like John Hollinger’s PER.But in football, a player’s contribution is impossible to measure directly, because there are too many variables that go into every result. And it can’t be measured indirectly, because the sample sizes are too small (that is, there are relatively few games and not as much data). Thus, player valuation is a quagmire of guesswork and debate.This is why I prefer questions of limited scope, like, “How certain are you that Peyton Manning is a good quarterback?” For which, the answer is “really extra pretty super-duper certain.” OK, that seems obvious, but ask me the same question about Joe Montana — whom many regard as the greatest quarterback of all time — and I’m not sure. It seems very, very likely to me that Montana was a good quarterback, but I am literally thousands of times less certain of that fact than I am when evaluating Manning.But that doesn’t even prove that Manning was better than Montana, though I tend to think the odds are tilted a bit in his favor. The problem with saying anyone is “the best” is that he has to be better than Montana, then better than Dan Marino, then better than Lawrence Taylor, etc. And it’s even possible that the true winner could be someone with incredible skills who was never in the right situation. Like, what if Jeff George had played for Bill Walsh? Anything is possible.So we can’t know for sure. But we constantly have to act on things we don’t know for sure. Thus, if my life depended on guessing who was the best NFL player of all time, I’d pick Peyton Manning.2But, oops, the answer was Randall Cunningham, and now I’m dead. Not because he’s clearly the best, but because he seems to have the best odds of being the best.Why do I think that? Have you got all day? OK then, short version, there are four main axes to the issue:3Any one of which could probably be a series of posts in its own right. Answering this isn’t quite as straightforward as it sounds.For the largest gap between a player’s TD per game and the baseline for his era, the answer is Peyton Manning. Not only is he the all-time pass touchdown per game leader, but he’s about .7 touchdowns per game higher than the league average for his era. But as a ratio between a passer’s TD per game and that of the entire league during the period he played, he is only in second place. For the highest, you have to go all the way back into the 20s, when Benjamin “Benny” Friedman of the New York Giants got it done:Manning has 1.51 times more TD passes per game than his era, but Friedman had 1.65 times more.If you look at the details, that 1.65 might not even do it justice. In 1929, Friedman had 20 TD passes. The next highest total that season: six. The entire league (12 teams) had only 81 TD passes; Friedman accounted for nearly one quarter of them. And he was way ahead of his time — the NFL wouldn’t even reach .6 touchdown passes per game until after Friedman retired.Also worth consideration is Dan Marino. While technically his TD rate may not have been as far above average as Manning’s, he played in an era when no one else was even close.8He also did it in an era that didn’t feature any massive changes to the game, unlike Friedman’s era and possibly the present one. Note that Manning has a lot of company in the two TD/game zone, including Aaron Rodgers right beneath him.I had to do a double take at first because there are so many modern players on that list, despite the fact that the measurement is relative to era. In other words, the current era isn’t just an era of pass-happy offenses, it’s an era in which some offenses are way more pass-happy than others.Rookie QB watchThis week we saw the Jacksonville Jaguars’ Blake Bortles score his first win (despite throwing three interceptions, he was the first rookie to win a game since last month), and Teddy Bridgewater score his first touchdown pass for the Minnesota Vikings. With the Cleveland Browns’ Manziel still on the bench, the rookie QB game seems to be all about Bortles, Bridgewater and the Raiders’ Derek Carr. Each of these now has at least four full games under their belt — that’s a big achievement unlocked. So let’s start comparing some real stats.What we learn about rookies is very different from what we learn from other QBs. Normally we care a lot about efficiency and how much a QB helps his team win, but for rookies we’re normally looking for raw production. But let’s take a peek at efficiency anyway, shall we?Here’s a table comparing the rate at which each QB’s drives end in a touchdown or interception, and the average Expected Points Added (EPA) per drive:Carr currently leads all three categories. Note that their EPAs are all negative, meaning they are scoring fewer points per drive than a typical NFL team — but Carr is doing the least-worst.Kicking awardsIt was kind of a crazy week for kicking, with the entire NFL making just three of eight tries from 50+ yards, but going 45 for 46 on all other attempts. (That’s why you see a large cluster of kickers just to the right of zero in the chart).Last week I talked about the golden triad of young kickers, which includes Blair Walsh, Justin Tucker and Dan Bailey. All three made all of their kicks in Week 7, and Walsh took the MVK award, largely due to his 55-yard make just before the half. It’s like the Hacker Gods were paying attention and wanted to justify my devoting a large section of this column every week to kickers.9Though, admittedly, my perception that one event resulted directly from the other could just be a fiction. From the Hacker Gods’ perspective, they may have simply programmed me and the universe to recognize Walsh at the same time.Cairo Santos also deserves recognition for hitting a 48-yard game-winning field goal, but the points vs. expectation model isn’t impressed by a 48-yard attempt.10As of this moment, the MVP algorithm doesn’t distinguish between close games that you won and close games that you lost.This week Walsh was one of two kickers (along with Shayne Graham of the New Orleans Saints) who had points above expectation higher than the margin of victory or defeat in their games. Unfortunately, both of their teams lost their games, so no kicker earns a “win” just yet. (My definition of a kicker “win” is that their points above expectation must have been the difference in the game –not just their actual points scored. Kicker “wins” are extremely rare. There have been none so far in 2014, and there were seven in 2013, with Justin Tucker taking two of them. In 2012 there were none.)Gunslinger of the weekMatthew Stafford led his team back from a 14-point third-quarter deficit — still down 13 points with under 4 minutes to go — to win against the New Orleans Saints. Oh, and he threw an interception in the fourth quarter with his team still down 10.Stafford, for all his woes as QB of the Lions, seems to have a game well suited to the gunslinger paradigm.Among QBs with 20 or more games with comeback opportunities (down 9+ in the second half), Stafford now has the third-highest winning percentage, behind only Tom Brady and Peyton Manning. This is, of course, despite his relatively high interception rate (e.g., over twice as high as Aaron Rodgers’s):That he did this for lowly Detroit is particularly remarkable to me, since Stafford has gotten some of the worst team support in football.There’s a basic way to test how much support a QB gets. Winning Percentage Added (WPA) is a stat that measures how a team’s chances of winning a game (based on league-wide models for a typical team) change after each play. Thus, a QB’s WPA for a game is how much his team’s chances of winning increased on the plays he was involved with. All else being equal, his team should win a game about 50 percent of the time plus the QB’s WPA.11If you’re clever you can adjust this for home/away, etc.If you take this estimate and then subtract from the actual result, you get a figure equal to the amount of winning percentage added by elements of the team that are NOT the passing game (including running, defense, and special teams). We can plot a comparison between these two like so:Some QBs like Tom Brady and Joe Flacco actually win more often than their passing would suggest, meaning the non-passing part of their team is contributing as well. Others have to overcome bad teams. Stafford is a great example of this, as he typically adds close to 10 percent to his teams chances, only to see even more stripped in the plays where he isn’t an active participant. In fact, Stafford gets the worst support of any QB with a positive WPA.Most empirically significant game of Week 8Lots of great and/or interesting QB matchups in Week 8, such as:Philip Rivers vs. Peyton ManningMatthew Stafford vs. Matt RyanJay Cutler vs. Tom BradyAndrew Luck vs. Ben RoethlisbergerAaron Rodgers vs. Drew BreesJoe Flacco vs. Andy DaltonRussell Wilson vs. Cam NewtonOoh, the final matchup is an interesting one. Two 25-year-old former rookie Pro Bowlers known for their running abilities — one 5 feet 11 inches and the other 6 feet 6 inches.Last week, Wilson joined the illustrious list of QBs who passed for 300 yards and ran for 100 in the same game:Yet the Seahawks picked up their third loss, equaling Wilson’s total from last season. As the boss notes, the Seahawks are in a precarious spot, such that, even aside from the information value of a loss, it may get very hard for the Hawks to make the playoffs even if they’re really good, considering their schedule and division. Are the Seahawks going to be a dynasty like the Pats or teams-Peyton-Manning-is-QBing? Or will they regress to the mean and/or burn out like most teams do?Both teams are 3-3 (though Carolina also has a tie). Historically, teams that start 4-3 make the playoffs about 30 percentage points more often than teams that start 3-4 (about 50 percent vs. about 20 percent). So it’s a high-leverage game on both sides.Reminder: If you tweet questions to me @skepticalsports, there is a non-zero chance that I’ll answer them here.Charts by Reuben Fischer-Baum. A player’s location on the y-axis represents the number of TDs he has thrown per game played for his entire career. The horizontal lines show the span of his career. The bubble at the end of each career shows you how many touchdown passes he threw in total. The thick black line shows you the NFL’s average TD’s thrown per game by year. What do we take away from this?First, NFL teams have gotten better at passing for touchdowns, though I was a little surprised at how many touchdowns were thrown in the 50s and 60s. Johnny Unitas, for example, wasn’t nearly the outlier I assumed he would be: While he did break what was then a long-standing record (ultimately by a very large amount), he was also a product of a very passing-friendly era.Manning now has the largest bubble, obviously, and in a shorter career than Brett Favre’s — so far. But the record-setting QBs are a pretty elite group.So, relatedly, here’s another question I got on Twitter: Stats: No matter how you slice and dice the stats — career stats, drive stats, winning stats, efficiency stats, or whatever you want — Manning generally comes out on top. But players in the NFL aren’t responsible for their stats to nearly the degree players are in baseball or basketball, so without more corroborating evidence, this doesn’t mean as much as people think.But perhaps even more important than the stats themselves is consistency: Manning’s consistency is preternatural. Since 2001, he has completed 65 percent or more of his passes every year and only once passed for fewer than 4,000 yards.4He had 3,747 in 2005. Most quarterbacks’ performance varies significantly from year to year, largely as a result of the changing variables around them. But Manning essentially does the same thing year in and year out.Lack of entanglement: Manning has played for four different coaches and two different teams now, and hasn’t failed to win 10 games since 2001.5Also, the Colts stunk the one year they were without him or Andrew Luck, though I’d discount this a bit because it isn’t clear that they were trying very hard to win. Of course, it’s still possible that he has been surrounded by superior talent, but that’s a lot of lucky to get. Looking at dynasties in NFL history, who has ever been so good for so long? The 49ers, who had three different coaches and two great QBs; the Patriots, with one quarterback and one great coach; and Peyton Manning. Winning consistently in the NFL is hard, especially in the salary cap era.But the playoffs: Manning gets knocked for performing below expectations in the playoffs, and I won’t dismiss the issue out of hand. As I’ve shown before, Manning handles tough defenses well.6In some preliminary research, I’ve also found that Manning performs slightly better in the playoffs against teams that he also played in the regular season. So there are basically three possibilities: first, Manning has gotten unlucky in the playoffs; second, Manning has gotten lucky in the regular season; or third, Manning just plays worse in the playoffs for some reason. I can’t disprove the third possibility, and I’m not above believing that sort of thing, but I haven’t seen a plausible explanation yet.The second and third axes are probably undervalued. Manning’s unnatural consistency in a number of different scenarios is a unique phenomenon. And this is what Bayesian inference is all about: I’ve just witnessed a phenomenon, and I want to know what the most likely causes are. To do this, I consider the likelihood of each potential cause, and the likelihood of those causes creating that effect.And so in this case the question is really, which is more likely: that Manning has been uniquely, historically, fortunate in having many great players and coaches around him constantly, or that Manning is a unique, historical talent?Chart of the weekOne area where Manning seems unassailable is in the record books, but in fairness to everyone else, he has presided over a distinctly offensive era. So how does his career touchdown record stack up to history?Let’s summarize every NFL QB’s career in one chart:7Like The New York Times did, but different. read more

Family affair Buckeye roots come full circle for Smiths

Talking to Spencer Smith, it’s quickly obvious that he is a family man. But mention his brother, Connor Smith, and his face brightens, his eyes widen and a toothy grin takes shape.  When they were younger, Spencer Smith, a redshirt sophomore fullback, and Connor, a redshirt junior offensive lineman, played many sports together, including soccer, basketball and baseball. But football is where they have always shared their strongest bond.The two played high school football at Colerain, a perennial public school powerhouse on the outskirts of Cincinnati, where they were coached by their father, Joe Smith. The brothers have since migrated 90 miles north to play at Ohio State.“I’d say first of all, my brother’s probably my best friend,” Spencer Smith said. “That’s one of the biggest reasons I decided to come here in the end is because of my relationship with him.”Connor Smith has truly relished the time spent with his brother even though they have always lived under the same roof and live together off campus.“Me and my brother, we’ve been on every team together growing up,” Connor Smith said. “We hang out all the time; it’s really a neat situation.”Considering all the quality time the brothers enjoy together, it comes as no surprise that OSU football is truly a family affair for the Smiths. Joe Smith was an offensive tackle and four-year letterman at OSU from 1979-1982. For him, the experience of playing OSU football has come full circle.“It’s been great for me, but truly it’s about them, the experience that they get a chance to go through,” said Joe Smith, now a veterinarian at College Hill Animal Hospital in Cincinnati. “It gives you something in common for the rest of your life with your boys.”The relationship between the two only seemed to strengthen on the football field, especially at Colerain high school. They were only on the field together for one season, but they did not waste any opportunity to line up side by side.“My junior year, when we played right next to each other, that was an unbelievable experience just knowing that I had a lot of trust in him. It’s something that’s almost indescribable,” Spencer Smith said. “He’s got your back, you’ve got his back. It’s like a bond that’s even stronger than just a teammate’s bond.”Now that they are at OSU and play different positions, the brothers don’t see much of each other on the field. But they manage to run into each other through alternative means.“When we played in high school, we were together a lot,” Connor Smith said. “We’re sort of coached by the same people now, so we’re in a lot of our meetings together now.”Because Joe Smith coached his sons in high school and was also available at home, the brothers picked his brain to get a sense of his football acumen.“He always pushed us hard. When we wanted to be pushed, he pushed,” Connor Smith said. “He’s very knowledgeable. He was a very good model for me and Spence.”Spencer Smith said his father was often a closed book when asked about his experiences playing at OSU. But Joe Smith always referenced an OSU coaching icon.“He’s a very humble man. I’d learn stuff through other people because he was so humble,” Spencer Smith said. “But he talked about Woody Hayes. He was recruited by Woody Hayes, and he played his redshirt year for Woody Hayes. That’s who he came to play for at Ohio State.”In Joe Smith’s mind, the brothers had enough of an innate desire for success that he did not need to get his point across often. However, that does not mean that he treated his sons differently than their teammates.“There were a few times when I had to get after them for effort, and I certainly made it publicly known. Me and the [Colerain] head coach both had sons on the team, and we had to make sure we didn’t play any favorites,” Joe Smith said. “You actually overcompensate because you’re harder on your own kids, but you do that to make sure there isn’t a prejudice there with the other kids.”For Spencer and Connor Smith, the coaching continued well after practice. Not only could they turn to their “coach” for advice on strategy and technique — but for guidance and life lessons, too. “I talk to my dad, if not every night, six out of seven nights of the week,” Spencer Smith said. “He’s always there to encourage me. It’s good because he’s been where I’ve been. Maybe different positions, maybe [at a] different time, but when it comes down to it, the tradition and excellence of how good either of our teams were, we’ve been in a lot of similar situations. “He’s probably been the biggest influence of my life, and he always has the right things to say. He knows what I’m going through, and it’s nice to always talk to him.”Spencer, Connor, and Joe Smith might have gone through many of the same exhilarating victories and heartbreaking losses, but according to Joe, the game has changed since his playing days.“Things were different then,” Joe Smith said. “There were more kids on scholarship, more kids to compete against. Spring ball was a lot longer. We didn’t have a mandatory academic day on Monday. We practiced every day. “The time commitment was more back then, just from what I can see. I think the way the coaches have to coddle the athlete now is much different.”But what hasn’t changed is OSU football’s tradition of excellence. Surviving the rest of the season will be tough Spencer Smith said, but he believes the team has a great foundation for success.“It takes an effort to manage your time, but you have all the support staff around you that makes it possible,” Spencer said. “It would be tough to do it all on your own.”Both on the field and in their family, support will never be an issue for the Smith brothers. They hope to carry their unbreakable bond to a national championship and use it to further the tradition of the OSU football family.“The goal is to win the national championship. We’ve been pretty close the last couple of years,” Spencer Smith said. “The Big Ten championship is always one of our team goals. You win the Big Ten championship, you’re always in the national title hunt.” read more

Football Ohio State safety Jordan Fuller misses game against Oregon State

Sophomore safety Jordan Fuller (4) awaits the snap during the second quarter at the OSU-Maryland game on Oct. 7. Credit: Ris Twigg | Former Assistant Photo EditorOhio State junior safety Jordan Fuller will not play against Oregon State, due to a hamstring injury.Redshirt sophomore Jahsen Wint and sophomore Isaiah Pryor started in place of Fuller, with both Wint and Pryor fighting for the starting safety position alongside Fuller in the offseason.Fuller was out on the field early, participating in warm-ups before the rest of the team.Fuller was named a team captain for the Buckeyes earlier this week. read more

Fortnite players arent happy with season 10 mech and challenges

first_imgPlayers aren’t thrilled over the season 10 changes. Epic Games It’s just one day into Fortnite season 10, or season X, and some players are already frustrated. Developer Epic Games made some big changes to the battle royale game, including adding a mech and changing the challenges format, that aren’t going over well with part of the fanbase, and the critics are letting everyone know. The big addition to Fortnite season 10 is the B.R.U.T.E. mech. The two-player-controlled robot has a shotgun. missile launcher and powerful shield and can move pretty quickly. Players on the Fortnite subreddit have created multiple threads about the mech, calling it overpowered. Even Fortnite World Cup solos champ Kyle “Bugha” Giersdorf found himself losing a match to a player in the B.R.U.T.E. Players also reacted on Twitter. Epic’s tweet about the release of season 10 on Thursday has hundreds of replies calling for the developer to vault the mech, which means to remove it from the game.  The B.R.U.T.E. has frustrated players, but Epic’s changes to the challenges format also has them upset and confused.In previous seasons, Epic released a weekly set of challenges that had players completing various tasks, from visiting certain locations on the map to eliminating other players. Each week there were free challenges available to everyone and paid ones for Battle Pass owners, and players had until the end of the season to finish them. Completing the tasks increased a player’s tier and the more tiers they reached, the more in-game items, cosmetics and skins they could unlock. What changed in season 10 is that instead of daily challenges, they’re Limited Time Missions and are available only for the week. There’re also Limited Time Mission Objectives, which’re sets of challenges that have a certain theme, such as the Road Trip missions that require players to traverse across the map. There’re also Prestige missions that’re available once the missions have been completed — players can redo them but with increased difficulty. A Fortnite subreddit thread was full of players upset about how the challenges have changed. Epic didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.  Fortnite has officially been ruined. RIP.— IM BACK (@Marcusv2x) August 1, 2019 6 Comments Share your voice Gaming You messed up with the mec, game is barely playable because of em. Please fix it and may we get an update on when we can expect them to be vaulted?— Sly (@bare31721885) August 1, 2019 Tags Vault the brutes ! pic.twitter.com/Fg5v3ykrUt— Chaxings (@Chaxings) August 1, 2019 Fortnitelast_img read more

Will Ongoing Maggi Crisis Affect Sales of Other Instant Noodles Brands

first_imgMaggi, a brand name that is used interchangeably with noodles in the country, has seen a plunge in its sales following reports of excess amount of lead and MSG (mono sodium glutamate) in a sample tested for quality. However, many fear that the ongoing Maggi crisis will not only have an impact on Nestle’s flagship product, but also affect the sales of other instant noodles brands. “We have not ordered any new stocks in the last eight days. This news has not just affected Maggi sales, but has also hit sales of other instant noodles brands,” The Times of India quoted the manager of a supermarket in Hyderabad as saying.Several retailers are reportedly reluctant to place any orders, fearing a ban on Nestle’s two-minute noodles, which was once considered a comfort food. The Delhi government has ordered investigation into other noodle brands amid rising health concerns.On 2 June, Kerala’s state-owned Civil Supplies Corporation (Supplyco) decided not to sell the product at its outlets. Other states including Karnataka, Maharashtra, Gujarat and Haryana have also reportedly ordered testing of Maggi samples.Meanwhile, Nestle has asked retailers nation-wide to step up Maggi promotions and “urged them not to be defensive if any customer talks about the controversy,” reported The Economic Times.”Please do not panic with the Maggi news,” Nestle wrote to retailers. “…some recent reports in the media about Maggi noodles are confusing people and we are working to clear the confusion as soon as possible…Nestle is a big enough company and will come clean out of it. Please don’t get into any sort of communication or opinion without legal guidance.”last_img read more